Evaluation of oculocephalic sympathetic function in vascular headache syndromes. Part I

Methods of evaluation

Craig Watson, N. Vijayan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Patients presenting with a unilateral ptosis and miosis offer a differential diagnostic challenge which ranges from 'simple' anisocoria, a benign condition, through a variety of vascular headache syndromes, to life threatening diseases of the peripheral or central nervous system. The resolution of this dilemma often rests with the documentation of clinically questionable findings and the localization of the lesion along the oculocephalic sympathetic pathway. In the first of our papers, we review simple bedside autonomic tests which can easily be used to document and localize lesions of the oculocephalic sympathetic pathway. We also briefly review the relevant neurotransmitter, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological information necessary to accurately interpret the results of these tests.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)192-199
Number of pages8
JournalHeadache
Volume22
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vascular Headaches
Anisocoria
Miosis
Headache Disorders
Central Nervous System Diseases
Peripheral Nervous System Diseases
Documentation
Neurotransmitter Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of oculocephalic sympathetic function in vascular headache syndromes. Part I : Methods of evaluation. / Watson, Craig; Vijayan, N.

In: Headache, Vol. 22, No. 5, 1982, p. 192-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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