Evaluation of myocardial perfusion abnormalities with gadolinium-enhanced snapshot MR imaging in humans: Work in progress

Saul Schaefer, Rem Van Tyen, David Saloner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine whether myocardial perfusion abnormalities could be detected in patients with coronary artery disease by means of contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) images, a snapshot imaging technique was used in six patients with coronary artery disease and four healthy subjects in conjunction with pharmacologic stress (dipyridamole infusion) and bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine. MR images from all patients and healthy subjects were quantitatively analyzed to define spatial changes in signal intensity after administration of dipyridamole and gadopentetate dimeglumine. The resultant findings were compared with findings on thallium201 scintigrams obtained after administration of dipyridamole and on coronary arteriograms in all patients. Nine myocardial regions supplied by stenosed arteries showed diminished levels of signal intensity after infusion of the contrast agent compared with those of normally perfused regions. These findings were in agreement with those obtained with Tl-201 scintigraphy (in eight of nine regions) and arteriography. Thus, contrast-enhanced high-speed MR imaging with use of dipyridamole enabled detection of regional perfusion abnormalities in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)795-801
Number of pages7
JournalRadiology
Volume185
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 1992

Keywords

  • Coronary vessels, diseases, 54.81
  • Coronary vessels, stenosis or obstruction, 54.81
  • Dipyridamole
  • Gadolinium
  • Magnetic resonance (MR), contrast enhancement
  • Magnetic resonance (MR), rapid imaging
  • Myocardium, ischemia, 511.779
  • Myocardium, MR, 511.1214

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

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