Evaluation of medical and veterinary students' attitudes toward a one health interprofessional curricular exercise

Jenna Nicole Winer, Keisuke Nakagawa, Patricia A Conrad, Lauren Brown, Michael S Wilkes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluates whether medical and veterinary students' attitudes toward "One Health" and interprofessional education changed after participating in a joint small group learning exercise focused on risk factors associated with zoonotic disease. A survey was distributed to third-year medical students (n = 98) and second-year veterinary students (n = 140), each with a 95% response rate. Overall, 92% of veterinary students and 73% of medical students agreed or strongly agreed that "One Health" was relevant to their desired specialty. Students from both schools largely agreed that interprofessional education should be a goal of the curriculum for their school, and that interprofessional approaches strengthen their overall education. Students reported increased confidence in their communication skills and improved ability to contribute to One Health collaborative teams. This educational intervention, built around a patient case, focused on a variety of learning objectives including skills (such as communication), knowledge (of zoonotic toxoplasmosis) and attitudes (toward collaborative learning and practice). By sparking an interest in One Health during their early professional education, we sought to encourage a new generation of physicians and veterinarians to adopt a more collaborative spirit to their clinical practice, which will ultimately benefit human, animal and environmental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-54
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Interprofessional Care
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Medical Students
Exercise
Students
Health
Zoonoses
Learning
Education
Communication
Professional Education
Aptitude
Environmental Health
Veterinarians
Toxoplasmosis
Curriculum
Joints
Physicians
Global Health

Keywords

  • Collaboration
  • Interprofessional education
  • Interprofessional learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of medical and veterinary students' attitudes toward a one health interprofessional curricular exercise. / Winer, Jenna Nicole; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Conrad, Patricia A; Brown, Lauren; Wilkes, Michael S.

In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 49-54.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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