Evaluation of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

Catherine R. Sheils, Allison R. Dahlke, Lindsey Kreutzer, Karl Y. Bilimoria, Anthony D. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program is well recognized in surgical quality measurement and is used widely in research. Recent calls to make it a platform for national public reporting and pay-for-performance initiatives highlight the importance of understanding which types of hospitals elect to participate in the program. Our objective was to compare characteristics of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to characteristics of nonparticipating US hospitals. Methods The 2013 American Hospital Association and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Healthcare Cost Report Information System datasets were used to compare characteristics and operating margins of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to those of nonparticipating hospitals. Results Of 3,872 general medical and surgical hospitals performing inpatient surgery in the United States, 475 (12.3%) participated in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Participating hospitals performed 29.0% of all operations in the United States. Compared with nonparticipating hospitals, American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals had a higher mean annual inpatient surgical case volume (6,426 vs 1,874; P < .001) and a larger mean number of hospital beds (420 vs 167; P < .001); participating hospitals were more often teaching hospitals (35.2% vs 4.1%; P < .001), had more quality-related accreditations (P < .001), and had higher mean operating margins (P < .05). States with the highest proportions of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program had established surgical quality improvement collaboratives. Conclusion The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals are large teaching hospitals with more quality-related accreditations and financial resources. These findings should be considered when reviewing research studies using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data, and the findings reinforce that efforts are needed to facilitate participation in surgical quality improvement by all hospital types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1182-1188
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume160
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Quality Improvement
Accreditation
Teaching Hospitals
Inpatients
American Hospital Association
Incentive Reimbursement
Medicaid
Medicare
Research
Information Systems
Health Care Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Evaluation of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. / Sheils, Catherine R.; Dahlke, Allison R.; Kreutzer, Lindsey; Bilimoria, Karl Y.; Yang, Anthony D.

In: Surgery (United States), Vol. 160, No. 5, 01.11.2016, p. 1182-1188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sheils, Catherine R. ; Dahlke, Allison R. ; Kreutzer, Lindsey ; Bilimoria, Karl Y. ; Yang, Anthony D. / Evaluation of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. In: Surgery (United States). 2016 ; Vol. 160, No. 5. pp. 1182-1188.
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abstract = "Background The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program is well recognized in surgical quality measurement and is used widely in research. Recent calls to make it a platform for national public reporting and pay-for-performance initiatives highlight the importance of understanding which types of hospitals elect to participate in the program. Our objective was to compare characteristics of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to characteristics of nonparticipating US hospitals. Methods The 2013 American Hospital Association and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Healthcare Cost Report Information System datasets were used to compare characteristics and operating margins of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program to those of nonparticipating hospitals. Results Of 3,872 general medical and surgical hospitals performing inpatient surgery in the United States, 475 (12.3{\%}) participated in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Participating hospitals performed 29.0{\%} of all operations in the United States. Compared with nonparticipating hospitals, American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals had a higher mean annual inpatient surgical case volume (6,426 vs 1,874; P < .001) and a larger mean number of hospital beds (420 vs 167; P < .001); participating hospitals were more often teaching hospitals (35.2{\%} vs 4.1{\%}; P < .001), had more quality-related accreditations (P < .001), and had higher mean operating margins (P < .05). States with the highest proportions of hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program had established surgical quality improvement collaboratives. Conclusion The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program hospitals are large teaching hospitals with more quality-related accreditations and financial resources. These findings should be considered when reviewing research studies using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data, and the findings reinforce that efforts are needed to facilitate participation in surgical quality improvement by all hospital types.",
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