Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women

Victoria M. Taylor, J. Carey Jackson, Yutaka Yasui, Alan Kuniyuki, Elizabeth Acorda, Ann Marchand, Stephen M. Schwartz, Shin-Ping Tu, Beti Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Southeast Asian women have low levels of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing participation. We conducted a group-randomized controlled trial to evaluate a cervical cancer screening intervention program targeting Seattle's Cambodian refugee community. Methods: Women who completed a baseline, community-based survey were eligible for the trial. Neighborhoods were the unit of randomization. Three hundred and seventy survey participants living in 17 neighborhoods were randomized to intervention or control status. Intervention group women received home visits by outreach workers and were invited to group meetings in neighborhood settings. The primary outcome measure was self-reported Pap testing in the year prior to completing a follow-up survey. Results: The proportion of women in the intervention group reporting recent cervical cancer screening increased from 44% at baseline to 61% at follow-up (+17%). The corresponding proportions among the control group were 51 and 62% (+11%). These temporal increases were statistically significant in both the intervention (P < 0.001) and control (P = 0.027) groups. Discussion: This study was unable to document an increase in Pap testing use specifically in the neighborhood-based outreach intervention group; rather, we found an increase in both intervention and control groups. A general awareness of the project among women and their health care providers as well as other ongoing cervical cancer screening promotional efforts may all have contributed to increases in Pap testing rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)320-327
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Detection and Prevention
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Control Groups
House Calls
Refugees
Group Processes
Women's Health
Random Allocation
Health Personnel
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cambodian Americans
  • Outreach
  • Pap testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Taylor, V. M., Jackson, J. C., Yasui, Y., Kuniyuki, A., Acorda, E., Marchand, A., ... Thompson, B. (2002). Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. Cancer Detection and Prevention, 26(4), 320-327. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0361-090X(02)00055-7

Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. / Taylor, Victoria M.; Jackson, J. Carey; Yasui, Yutaka; Kuniyuki, Alan; Acorda, Elizabeth; Marchand, Ann; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Tu, Shin-Ping; Thompson, Beti.

In: Cancer Detection and Prevention, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.12.2002, p. 320-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, VM, Jackson, JC, Yasui, Y, Kuniyuki, A, Acorda, E, Marchand, A, Schwartz, SM, Tu, S-P & Thompson, B 2002, 'Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women', Cancer Detection and Prevention, vol. 26, no. 4, pp. 320-327. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0361-090X(02)00055-7
Taylor, Victoria M. ; Jackson, J. Carey ; Yasui, Yutaka ; Kuniyuki, Alan ; Acorda, Elizabeth ; Marchand, Ann ; Schwartz, Stephen M. ; Tu, Shin-Ping ; Thompson, Beti. / Evaluation of an outreach intervention to promote cervical cancer screening among Cambodian American women. In: Cancer Detection and Prevention. 2002 ; Vol. 26, No. 4. pp. 320-327.
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