Evaluation of acoustic wave propagation velocities in the ocular lens and vitreous tissues of pigs, dogs, and rabbits

Christiane Görig, Tomy Varghese, Timothy Stiles, Jan van den Broek, James A. Zagzebski, Christopher J Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To evaluate propagation velocity of acoustic waves through the lens and vitreous body of pigs, dogs, and rabbits and determine whether there were associations between acoustic wave speed and age, temperature, and time after enucleation. Sample population - 9 pig, 40 dog, and 20 rabbit lenses and 16 pig, 17 dog, and 23 rabbit vitreous bodies. Procedure - Acoustic wave velocities through the ocular structures were measured by use of the substitution technique. Results - Mean sound wave velocities in lenses of pigs, dogs, and rabbits were 1,681, 1,707, and 1,731 m/s, respectively, at 36°C. Mean sound wave velocities in the vitreous body of pigs, dogs, and rabbits were 1,535, 1,535, and 1,534 m/s, respectively, at 38°C. The sound wave speed through the vitreous humor, but not the lens, increased linearly with temperature. An association between wave speed and age was observed in the rabbit tissues. Time after enucleation did not affect the velocity of sound in the lens or vitreous body. The sound wave speed conversion factors for lenses, calculated with respect to human ocular tissue at 36°C, were 1.024, 1.040, and 1.055 for pig, dog, and rabbit lenses, respectively. Conclusions and clinical relevance - Conversion factors for the speed of sound through lens tissues are needed to avoid underestimation of the thickness of the lens and axial length of the eye in dogs during comparative A-mode ultrasound examinations. These findings are important for accurate calculation of intraocular lens power required to achieve emmetropia in veterinary patients after surgical lens extraction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-295
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume67
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2006
Externally publishedYes

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eye lens
Crystalline Lens
Lens
Lenses
Swine
rabbits
Dogs
Rabbits
Vitreous Body
swine
dogs
eyes
Eye Axial Length
Emmetropia
tissues
Temperature
Intraocular Lenses
temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of acoustic wave propagation velocities in the ocular lens and vitreous tissues of pigs, dogs, and rabbits. / Görig, Christiane; Varghese, Tomy; Stiles, Timothy; van den Broek, Jan; Zagzebski, James A.; Murphy, Christopher J.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 67, No. 2, 02.2006, p. 288-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Görig, Christiane ; Varghese, Tomy ; Stiles, Timothy ; van den Broek, Jan ; Zagzebski, James A. ; Murphy, Christopher J. / Evaluation of acoustic wave propagation velocities in the ocular lens and vitreous tissues of pigs, dogs, and rabbits. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2006 ; Vol. 67, No. 2. pp. 288-295.
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