Evaluation of a cow-side immunoassay kit for assessing IgG concentration in colostrum

Munashe Chigerwe, Maisie E. Dawes, Jeff W. Tyler, John R. Middleton, Malantus P. Moore, Dusty M. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine sensitivity and specificity of a cow-side immunoassay kit for assessing IgG concentration in colostrum. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 76 dairy and 11 beef cows of various parities. Procedure - Colostrum from first, second, and third milkings and milk samples were collected, and IgG concentration was determined by means of radial immunodiffusion. The immunoassay was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated by comparing results of the immunoassay (positive vs negative) with results of immunodiffusion (< 50 g/L vs ≥ 50 g/L). Results - 135 colostrum or milk samples were col-lected. Mean ± SD colostral IgG concentrations, determined by means of radial immunodiffusion for dairy and beef cows were 65.4 ± 51.4 g/L and 114.8 ± 42.7 g/L, respectively. Mean IgG concentrations for first-, second-, and third-milking colostrum samples and for milk samples were 92 ± 49.0 g/L, 74.6 ± 45.1 g/L, 47.5 ± 32 g/L, and 6.8 ± 3.8 g/L, respectively. Sensitivity of the immunoassay (ie, percentage of samples with IgG concentration < 50 g/L with a positive immunoassay result) was 93%, and specificity (ie, percentage of samples with IgG concentration > 50 g/L with a negative immunoassay result) was 76%. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results suggested that the immunoassay kit was an acceptable cow-side test to identify colostrum samples with IgG concentrations < 50 g/L. The immunoassay kit should be useful in screening colostrum for adequate IgG concentration before feeding to calves or storage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-131
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume227
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Colostrum
colostrum
immunoassays
Immunoassay
Immunoglobulin G
cows
Immunodiffusion
Sensitivity and Specificity
beef cows
Parity
prospective studies
milking
dairies
Milk
calves
Prospective Studies
screening
sampling
milk
animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Evaluation of a cow-side immunoassay kit for assessing IgG concentration in colostrum. / Chigerwe, Munashe; Dawes, Maisie E.; Tyler, Jeff W.; Middleton, John R.; Moore, Malantus P.; Nagy, Dusty M.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 227, No. 1, 01.07.2005, p. 129-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chigerwe, Munashe ; Dawes, Maisie E. ; Tyler, Jeff W. ; Middleton, John R. ; Moore, Malantus P. ; Nagy, Dusty M. / Evaluation of a cow-side immunoassay kit for assessing IgG concentration in colostrum. In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association. 2005 ; Vol. 227, No. 1. pp. 129-131.
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