Evaluating symmetry and facial motion using 3D videography

Moses D. Salgado, Shane Curtiss, Travis Tate Tollefson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advances in 3-dimensional (3D) data capture, tracking, and computer modeling now allow for more appropriate measurement and analysis of the face. 3D video not only enables precise analysis of facial symmetry, it broadens our capabilities to accurately study facial volume and facial movement and the forces generated within tissue. Research in facial plastics outcomes has traditionally been evaluated with subjective measures. Current 3D methods are far superior and generate reproducible, accurate, and objective data for such clinical studies. As these technologies become more readily available, there will be a paradigm shift in how aesthetics research is conducted. 3D videography and newer technologies on the horizon will not only change current research methods; they will be much more pervasive in the clinical practice of aesthetic surgeons as they are incorporated into preoperative planning and used to improve patient communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-356
Number of pages6
JournalFacial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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Esthetics
Research
Technology
Communication
Surgeons
Clinical Studies

Keywords

  • 3D
  • Digital imaging
  • Facial analysis
  • Symmetry
  • Three-dimensional videography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Evaluating symmetry and facial motion using 3D videography. / Salgado, Moses D.; Curtiss, Shane; Tollefson, Travis Tate.

In: Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America, Vol. 18, No. 2, 05.2010, p. 351-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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