European canine lymphoma network consensus recommendations for reporting flow cytometry in canine hematopoietic neoplasms

S. Comazzi, P. R. Avery, O. A. Garden, F. Riondato, B. Rütgen, William Vernau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Flow cytometry (FC) is assuming increasing importance in diagnosis in veterinary oncology. The European Canine Lymphoma Network (ECLN) is an international cooperation of different institutions working on canine lymphoma diagnosis and therapy. The ECLN panel of experts on FC has defined the issue of reporting FC on canine lymphoma and leukemia as their first hot topic, since a standardized report that includes all the important information is still lacking in veterinary medicine. Methods: The flow cytometry panel of the ECLN started a consensus initiative using the Delphi approach. Clinicians were considered the main target of FC reports. A panel of experts in FC was interrogated about the important information needed from a report. Results: Using the feedback from clinicians and subsequent discussion, a list of information to be included in the report was made, with four different levels of recommendation. The final report should include both a quantitative part and a qualitative or descriptive part with interpretation of the salient results. Other items discussed included the necessity of reporting data regarding the quality of samples, use of absolute numbers of positive cells, cutoff values, the intensity of fluorescence, and possible aberrant patterns of antigen expression useful from a clinical point of view. Conclusion: The consensus initiative is a first step toward standardization of diagnostic approach to canine hematopoietic neoplasms among different institutions and countries. This harmonization will improve communication and patient care and also facilitate the multicenter studies necessary to further our knowledge of canine hematopoietic neoplasms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCytometry Part B - Clinical Cytometry
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

Fingerprint

Hematologic Neoplasms
Canidae
Lymphoma
Flow Cytometry
International Cooperation
Veterinary Medicine
Multicenter Studies
Patient Care
Leukemia
Cell Count
Fluorescence
Antigens

Keywords

  • Dog
  • European canine lymphoma network
  • Guidelines
  • Lymphoma
  • Report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Histology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

European canine lymphoma network consensus recommendations for reporting flow cytometry in canine hematopoietic neoplasms. / Comazzi, S.; Avery, P. R.; Garden, O. A.; Riondato, F.; Rütgen, B.; Vernau, William.

In: Cytometry Part B - Clinical Cytometry, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Flow cytometry (FC) is assuming increasing importance in diagnosis in veterinary oncology. The European Canine Lymphoma Network (ECLN) is an international cooperation of different institutions working on canine lymphoma diagnosis and therapy. The ECLN panel of experts on FC has defined the issue of reporting FC on canine lymphoma and leukemia as their first hot topic, since a standardized report that includes all the important information is still lacking in veterinary medicine. Methods: The flow cytometry panel of the ECLN started a consensus initiative using the Delphi approach. Clinicians were considered the main target of FC reports. A panel of experts in FC was interrogated about the important information needed from a report. Results: Using the feedback from clinicians and subsequent discussion, a list of information to be included in the report was made, with four different levels of recommendation. The final report should include both a quantitative part and a qualitative or descriptive part with interpretation of the salient results. Other items discussed included the necessity of reporting data regarding the quality of samples, use of absolute numbers of positive cells, cutoff values, the intensity of fluorescence, and possible aberrant patterns of antigen expression useful from a clinical point of view. Conclusion: The consensus initiative is a first step toward standardization of diagnostic approach to canine hematopoietic neoplasms among different institutions and countries. This harmonization will improve communication and patient care and also facilitate the multicenter studies necessary to further our knowledge of canine hematopoietic neoplasms.",
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AU - Vernau, William

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