Estrogens and lipids: Can HRT, designer estrogens, and phytoestrogens reduce cardiovascular risk markers after menopause?

Abraham A. Ariyo, Amparo C Villablanca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

HRT may act preventively to reduce morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease in primary prevention. The development of SERMs adds a new, exciting, and promising therapeutic option to this field, as does the enhanced availability of soy phytoestrogen products. Although clinical trial data are incomplete, epidemiologic studies suggest that HRT raises HDL-C and triglyceride levels and lowers LDL-C levels. In addition, HRT lowers levels of Lp(a). These changes account for up to 50% of the cardiovascular risk reduction observed with HRT. In contrast, SERMs have less uniform effects. Both SERMs and phytoestrogens are less potent than HRT but have greater tissue selectivity. Although further study is needed, current information suggests that SERMs and phytoestrogens have significant potential to reduce CAD risk and may be a viable alternative to HRT for modest lowering of lipid levels. Phytoestrogens may be particularly useful for reducing CAD risk in men because they do not cause the side effects associated with estrogen. Additional clinical trials are necessary to determine whether the favorable lipid effects associated with HRT, SERMs, and phytoestrogens are linked to protection against cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, physicians should consider the use of HRT, SERMs, and phytoestrogens for lowering lipid levels and reducing cardiovascular risk in women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-30
Number of pages8
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume111
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2002

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Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators
Phytoestrogens
Menopause
Estrogens
Lipids
Cardiovascular Diseases
Clinical Trials
Risk Reduction Behavior
Primary Prevention
Epidemiologic Studies
Triglycerides
Morbidity
Physicians
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Estrogens and lipids : Can HRT, designer estrogens, and phytoestrogens reduce cardiovascular risk markers after menopause? / Ariyo, Abraham A.; Villablanca, Amparo C.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 111, No. 1, 2002, p. 23-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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