Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects

N. J. Waitzman, Patrick S Romano, R. M. Scheffler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

170 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Birth defects now are the leading cause of infant mortality and a major contributor to heightened morbidity in the United States. Considerable medical and nonmedical resources are devoted to treating persons with birth defects. Yet, little is known about birth defects' economic burden to society and the profile of component direct and indirect costs over the lifespan of those born with specific birth defects. Using an incidence approach, we made the most comprehensive estimates to date of the cost of 18 of the most clinically significant birth defects in the United States. Our analysis provides the basis for assessing competing strategies for research and prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)188-205
Number of pages18
JournalInquiry
Volume31
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Economics
Costs and Cost Analysis
costs
economics
Infant Mortality
infant mortality
life-span
morbidity
incidence
Morbidity
cause
human being
Incidence
Research
resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Waitzman, N. J., Romano, P. S., & Scheffler, R. M. (1994). Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects. Inquiry, 31(2), 188-205.

Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects. / Waitzman, N. J.; Romano, Patrick S; Scheffler, R. M.

In: Inquiry, Vol. 31, No. 2, 1994, p. 188-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Waitzman, NJ, Romano, PS & Scheffler, RM 1994, 'Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects', Inquiry, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 188-205.
Waitzman NJ, Romano PS, Scheffler RM. Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects. Inquiry. 1994;31(2):188-205.
Waitzman, N. J. ; Romano, Patrick S ; Scheffler, R. M. / Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects. In: Inquiry. 1994 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 188-205.
@article{d6fd5789c70249388ca32b1d9356927c,
title = "Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects",
abstract = "Birth defects now are the leading cause of infant mortality and a major contributor to heightened morbidity in the United States. Considerable medical and nonmedical resources are devoted to treating persons with birth defects. Yet, little is known about birth defects' economic burden to society and the profile of component direct and indirect costs over the lifespan of those born with specific birth defects. Using an incidence approach, we made the most comprehensive estimates to date of the cost of 18 of the most clinically significant birth defects in the United States. Our analysis provides the basis for assessing competing strategies for research and prevention.",
author = "Waitzman, {N. J.} and Romano, {Patrick S} and Scheffler, {R. M.}",
year = "1994",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "188--205",
journal = "Inquiry",
issn = "0046-9580",
publisher = "Excellus Health Plan",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Estimates of the economic costs of birth defects

AU - Waitzman, N. J.

AU - Romano, Patrick S

AU - Scheffler, R. M.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Birth defects now are the leading cause of infant mortality and a major contributor to heightened morbidity in the United States. Considerable medical and nonmedical resources are devoted to treating persons with birth defects. Yet, little is known about birth defects' economic burden to society and the profile of component direct and indirect costs over the lifespan of those born with specific birth defects. Using an incidence approach, we made the most comprehensive estimates to date of the cost of 18 of the most clinically significant birth defects in the United States. Our analysis provides the basis for assessing competing strategies for research and prevention.

AB - Birth defects now are the leading cause of infant mortality and a major contributor to heightened morbidity in the United States. Considerable medical and nonmedical resources are devoted to treating persons with birth defects. Yet, little is known about birth defects' economic burden to society and the profile of component direct and indirect costs over the lifespan of those born with specific birth defects. Using an incidence approach, we made the most comprehensive estimates to date of the cost of 18 of the most clinically significant birth defects in the United States. Our analysis provides the basis for assessing competing strategies for research and prevention.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028277755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028277755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 188

EP - 205

JO - Inquiry

JF - Inquiry

SN - 0046-9580

IS - 2

ER -