Essential veterinary education in emerging infections, modes of introduction of exotic animals, zoonotic diseases, bioterrorism, implications for human and animal health and disease manifestation

Bruno B Chomel, N. Marano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A fundamental role of the veterinary profession is the protection of human health through wholesome food and control of diseases of animal origin, especially zoonoses. Therefore, training of veterinary students worldwide needs to face the new challenges posed by emerging infections, both from wildlife and domestic animals, as well as risks from bio/agroterrorism. New courses emphasising recognition, response, recovery and prevention must be developed to respond to natural or intentionally induced emerging diseases and zoonoses. Training programmes in applied epidemiology, zoonoses and foreign animal diseases are crucial for the development of a strong workforce to deal with microbial threats. Students should learn the reporting pathways for reportable diseases in their countries or states. Knowledge of the principles of ecology and ecosystems should be acquired during pre-veterinary studies. Elective classes on wildlife diseases, emphasising wildlife zoonotic diseases, should be offered during the veterinary curriculum, as well as a course on risk communication, since veterinarians are frequently in the position of having to convey complex information under adverse circumstances.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-565
Number of pages7
JournalOIE Revue Scientifique et Technique
Volume28
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 2009

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bioterrorism
diseases and disorders (animals and humans)
veterinary education
animal and human health
emerging diseases
zoonoses
veterinarians
wildlife
animals
risk communication
notifiable disease
wildlife diseases
labor force
animal diseases
curriculum
foodborne illness
education programs
domestic animals
human health
epidemiology

Keywords

  • Bioterrorism
  • Curriculum
  • Emerging zoonoses
  • Exotic companion animals
  • Veterinary education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

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