Equine fetal adrenal, gonadal and placental steroidogenesis

Erin L. Legacki, Barry A. Ball, C. Jo Corbin, Shavahn C. Loux, Kirsten E. Scoggin, Scott D Stanley, Alan J Conley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Equine fetuses have substantial circulating pregnenolone concentrations and thus have been postulated to provide significant substrate for placental 5α-reduced pregnane production, but the fetal site of pregnenolone synthesis remains unclear. The current studies investigated steroid concentrations in blood, adrenal glands, gonads and placenta from fetuses (4, 6, 9 and 10 months of gestational age (GA)), as well as tissue steroidogenic enzyme transcript levels. Pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were the most abundant steroids in fetal blood, pregnenolone was consistently higher but decreased progressively with GA. Tissue steroid concentrations generally paralleled those in serum with time. Adrenal and gonadal tissue pregnenolone concentrations were similar and 100-fold higher than those in allantochorion. DHEA was far higher in gonads than adrenals and progesterone was higher in adrenals than gonads. Androstenedione decreased with GA in adrenals but not in gonads. Transcript analysis generally supported these data. CYP17A1 was higher in fetal gonads than adrenals or allantochorion, and HSD3B1 was higher in fetal adrenals and allantochorion than gonads. CYP11A1 transcript was also significantly higher in adrenals and gonads than allantochorion and CYP19 and SRD5A1 transcripts were higher in allantochorion than either fetal adrenals or gonads. Given these data, and their much greater size, the fetal gonads are the source of DHEA and likely contribute more than fetal adrenal glands to circulating fetal pregnenolone concentrations. Low CYP11A1 but high HSD3B1 and SRD5A1 transcript abundance in allantochorion, and low tissue pregnenolone, suggests that endogenous placental pregnenolone synthesis is low and likely contributes little to equine placental 5α-reduced pregnane secretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-454
Number of pages10
JournalReproduction
Volume154
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Pregnenolone
Gonads
Horses
Dehydroepiandrosterone
Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme
Gestational Age
Pregnanes
Steroids
Adrenal Glands
Fetus
Aromatase
Androstenedione
Fetal Blood
Placenta
Progesterone
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Embryology
  • Endocrinology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Legacki, E. L., Ball, B. A., Corbin, C. J., Loux, S. C., Scoggin, K. E., Stanley, S. D., & Conley, A. J. (2017). Equine fetal adrenal, gonadal and placental steroidogenesis. Reproduction, 154(4), 445-454. https://doi.org/10.1530/REP-17-0239

Equine fetal adrenal, gonadal and placental steroidogenesis. / Legacki, Erin L.; Ball, Barry A.; Corbin, C. Jo; Loux, Shavahn C.; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Stanley, Scott D; Conley, Alan J.

In: Reproduction, Vol. 154, No. 4, 2017, p. 445-454.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Legacki, EL, Ball, BA, Corbin, CJ, Loux, SC, Scoggin, KE, Stanley, SD & Conley, AJ 2017, 'Equine fetal adrenal, gonadal and placental steroidogenesis', Reproduction, vol. 154, no. 4, pp. 445-454. https://doi.org/10.1530/REP-17-0239
Legacki EL, Ball BA, Corbin CJ, Loux SC, Scoggin KE, Stanley SD et al. Equine fetal adrenal, gonadal and placental steroidogenesis. Reproduction. 2017;154(4):445-454. https://doi.org/10.1530/REP-17-0239
Legacki, Erin L. ; Ball, Barry A. ; Corbin, C. Jo ; Loux, Shavahn C. ; Scoggin, Kirsten E. ; Stanley, Scott D ; Conley, Alan J. / Equine fetal adrenal, gonadal and placental steroidogenesis. In: Reproduction. 2017 ; Vol. 154, No. 4. pp. 445-454.
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