Epidermal growth factor receptor relocalization and kinase activity are necessary for directional migration of keratinocytes in DC electric fields

Kathy S. Fang, Edward Ionides, George Oster, Richard Nuccitelli, Roslyn Rivkah Isseroff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human keratinocytes migrate towards the negative pole in DC electric fields of physiological strength. This directional migration is promoted by epidermal growth factor (EGF). To investigate how EGF and its receptor (EGFR) regulate this directionality, we first examined the effect of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including PD158780, a specific inhibitor for EGFR, on this response. At low concentrations, PD158780 inhibited keratinocyte migration directionality, but not the rate of migration; at higher concentrations, it reduced the migration rate as well. The less specific inhibitors, genistein, lavendustin A and tyrphostin B46, reduced the migration rate, but did not affect migration directionality. These data suggest that inhibition of EGFR kinase activity alone reduces directed motility, and inhibition of multiple tyrosine kinases, including EGFR, reduces the cell migration rate. EGFR redistribution also correlates with directional migration. EGFR concentrated on the cathodal face of the cell as early as 5 minutes after exposure to electric fields. PD158780 abolished EGFR localization to the cathodal face. These data suggest that EGFR kinase activity and redistribution in the plasma membrane are required for the directional migration of keratinocytes in DC electric fields. This study provides the first insights into the mechanisms of directed cell migration in electric fields.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1967-1978
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cell Science
Volume112
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Keratinocytes
Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Cell Movement
Phosphotransferases
Genistein
Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Epidermal Growth Factor
Cell Membrane
6-(methylamino)pyrido(3,4-d)pyrimidine

Keywords

  • Epidermal growth factor receptor
  • Galvanotaxis
  • Keratinocyte

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Epidermal growth factor receptor relocalization and kinase activity are necessary for directional migration of keratinocytes in DC electric fields. / Fang, Kathy S.; Ionides, Edward; Oster, George; Nuccitelli, Richard; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah.

In: Journal of Cell Science, Vol. 112, No. 12, 1999, p. 1967-1978.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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