Epidemiologic linkage of rodent and human hantavirus genomic sequences in case investigations of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Brian Hjelle, Norah Torrez-Martinez, Frederick T. Koster, Michele T Jay-Russell, Michael S. Ascher, Ted Brown, Pamela Reynolds, Paul Ettestad, Ronald E. Voorhees, John Sarisky, Russell E. Enscore, Lawrence Sands, David G. Mosley, Clare Kioski, Ralph T. Bryan, C. Mack Sewell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sin Nombre virus (SNV) causes the zoonotic disease hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). Its mechanisms of transmission from rodent to human are poorly understood. It is possible that specific genetic signature sequences could be used to determine the probable site of each case-patient's exposure. Environmental assessments suggested 12 possible sites of rodent exposure for 6 HPS patients. Rodents were captured at 11 of the 12 sites and screened for SNV infection within 2 weeks of the patient's diagnosis. Viral sequences amplified from tissues of rodents at each site were compared with those from case-patients' tissues. Rodents bearing viruses with genetic sequence identity to case-patients' viruses across 2 genomic segments were identified in 4 investigations but never at >1 site. Indoor exposures to rodents were especially common at implicated sites. By distinguishing among multiple possible sites of exposure, viral genotyping studies can enhance understanding of the conditions associated with infection by SNV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)781-786
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume173
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Hantavirus
Rodentia
Sin Nombre virus
Viruses
Zoonoses
Virus Diseases
Pedigree
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Hjelle, B., Torrez-Martinez, N., Koster, F. T., Jay-Russell, M. T., Ascher, M. S., Brown, T., ... Sewell, C. M. (1996). Epidemiologic linkage of rodent and human hantavirus genomic sequences in case investigations of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 173(4), 781-786.

Epidemiologic linkage of rodent and human hantavirus genomic sequences in case investigations of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. / Hjelle, Brian; Torrez-Martinez, Norah; Koster, Frederick T.; Jay-Russell, Michele T; Ascher, Michael S.; Brown, Ted; Reynolds, Pamela; Ettestad, Paul; Voorhees, Ronald E.; Sarisky, John; Enscore, Russell E.; Sands, Lawrence; Mosley, David G.; Kioski, Clare; Bryan, Ralph T.; Sewell, C. Mack.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 173, No. 4, 1996, p. 781-786.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hjelle, B, Torrez-Martinez, N, Koster, FT, Jay-Russell, MT, Ascher, MS, Brown, T, Reynolds, P, Ettestad, P, Voorhees, RE, Sarisky, J, Enscore, RE, Sands, L, Mosley, DG, Kioski, C, Bryan, RT & Sewell, CM 1996, 'Epidemiologic linkage of rodent and human hantavirus genomic sequences in case investigations of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 173, no. 4, pp. 781-786.
Hjelle, Brian ; Torrez-Martinez, Norah ; Koster, Frederick T. ; Jay-Russell, Michele T ; Ascher, Michael S. ; Brown, Ted ; Reynolds, Pamela ; Ettestad, Paul ; Voorhees, Ronald E. ; Sarisky, John ; Enscore, Russell E. ; Sands, Lawrence ; Mosley, David G. ; Kioski, Clare ; Bryan, Ralph T. ; Sewell, C. Mack. / Epidemiologic linkage of rodent and human hantavirus genomic sequences in case investigations of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1996 ; Vol. 173, No. 4. pp. 781-786.
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