Epidemiologic evaluation of diarrhea in dogs in an animal shelter

Susanne H. Sokolow, Courtney Rand, Stanley L Marks, Niki L. Drazenovich, Elizabeth J. Kather, Janet E Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives - To determine associations among infectious pathogens and diarrheal disease in dogs in an animal shelter and demonstrate the use of geographic information systems (GISs) for tracking spatial distributions of diarrheal disease within shelters. Sample population - Feces from 120 dogs. Procedure - Fresh fecal specimens were screened for bacteria and bacterial toxins via bacteriologic culture and ELISA, parvovirus via ELISA, canine coronavirus via nested polymerase chain reaction assay, protozoal cysts and oocysts via a direct fluorescent antibody technique, and parasite ova and larvae via microscopic examination of direct wet mounts and zinc sulfate centrifugation flotation. Results - Salmonella enterica and Brachyspira spp were not common, whereas other pathogens such as canine coronavirus and Helicobacter spp were common among the dogs that were surveyed. Only intestinal parasites and Campylobacter jejuni infection were significant risk factors for diarrhea by univariate odds ratio analysis. Giardia lamblia was significantly underestimated by fecal flotation, compared with a direct fluorescent antibody technique. Spatial analysis of case specimens by use of GIS indicated that diarrhea was widespread throughout the entire shelter, and spatial statistical analysis revealed no evidence of spatial clustering of case specimens. Conclusions and clinical relevance - This study provided an epidemiologic overview of diarrhea and interacting diarrhea-associated pathogens in a densely housed, highly predisposed shelter population of dogs. Several of the approaches used in this study, such as use of a spatial representation of case specimens and considering multiple etiologies simultaneously, were novel and illustrate an integrated approach to epidemiologic investigations in shelter populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1018-1024
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

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Diarrhea
diarrhea
Canine Coronavirus
Canine coronavirus
Dogs
Direct Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Geographic Information Systems
Spatial Analysis
dogs
geographic information systems
fluorescent antibody technique
pathogens
animals
Parasites
Brachyspira
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay
bacterial toxins
Campylobacter Infections
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Epidemiologic evaluation of diarrhea in dogs in an animal shelter. / Sokolow, Susanne H.; Rand, Courtney; Marks, Stanley L; Drazenovich, Niki L.; Kather, Elizabeth J.; Foley, Janet E.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 66, No. 6, 06.2005, p. 1018-1024.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sokolow, Susanne H. ; Rand, Courtney ; Marks, Stanley L ; Drazenovich, Niki L. ; Kather, Elizabeth J. ; Foley, Janet E. / Epidemiologic evaluation of diarrhea in dogs in an animal shelter. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 2005 ; Vol. 66, No. 6. pp. 1018-1024.
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