Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease)

Martin L. Katz, Joan R. Coates, Christine Toedebusch, Jacob D. Taylor, Melissa Carpentier, Whitney M. Young, Fred A. Wininger, Derek Kennedy, Brian R. Vuillemenot, Charles A. O'Neill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a canine model of classical late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease), a study was conducted to evaluate the potential pharmacological activity of recombinant human tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (rhTPP1) enzyme replacement therapy administered directly to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CLN2 disease is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder resulting from mutations in CLN2, which encodes the soluble lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase-1 (TPP1). Infants with mutations in both CLN2 alleles develop normally but in the late-infantile/early-childhood period undergo progressive neurological decline accompanied by pronounced brain atrophy. The disorder, a form of Batten disease, is uniformly fatal, with clinical signs starting between 2 and 4 years of age and death usually occurring by the early teenage years. Dachshunds homozygous for a null mutation in the canine ortholog of CLN2 (TPP1) exhibit a similar disorder that progresses to end stage at 10.5-11 months of age. Administration of rhTPP1 via infusion into the CSF every other week, starting at approximately 2.5 months of age, resulted in dose-dependent significant delays in disease progression, as measured by delayed onset of neurologic deficits, improved performance on a cognitive function test, reduced brain atrophy, and increased life span. Based on these findings, a clinical study evaluating the potential therapeutic value of rhTPP1 administration into the CSF of children with CLN2 disease has been initiated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1591-1598
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume92
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses
Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Disease Progression
Canidae
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Mutation
Atrophy
Brain
Neurologic Manifestations
Human Activities
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Cognition
Alleles
tripeptidyl-peptidase 1
Pharmacology
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Batten disease
  • Cerebrospinal fluid
  • CLN2
  • Dachshund
  • Lysosomal storage disease
  • NCL
  • TPP1
  • Tripeptidyl peptidase-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease). / Katz, Martin L.; Coates, Joan R.; Toedebusch, Christine; Taylor, Jacob D.; Carpentier, Melissa; Young, Whitney M.; Wininger, Fred A.; Kennedy, Derek; Vuillemenot, Brian R.; O'Neill, Charles A.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 92, No. 11, 01.01.2014, p. 1591-1598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katz, ML, Coates, JR, Toedebusch, C, Taylor, JD, Carpentier, M, Young, WM, Wininger, FA, Kennedy, D, Vuillemenot, BR & O'Neill, CA 2014, 'Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease)', Journal of Neuroscience Research, vol. 92, no. 11, pp. 1591-1598. https://doi.org/10.1002/jnr.23423
Katz, Martin L. ; Coates, Joan R. ; Toedebusch, Christine ; Taylor, Jacob D. ; Carpentier, Melissa ; Young, Whitney M. ; Wininger, Fred A. ; Kennedy, Derek ; Vuillemenot, Brian R. ; O'Neill, Charles A. / Enzyme replacement therapy attenuates disease progression in a canine model of late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (CLN2 disease). In: Journal of Neuroscience Research. 2014 ; Vol. 92, No. 11. pp. 1591-1598.
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