Enhancing the mechanical properties of engineered tissue through matrix remodeling via the signaling phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid

Pasha Hadidi, Kyriacos A. Athanasiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knee meniscus fibrocartilage is frequently injured, resulting in approximately 1 million procedures annually in the US and Europe. Its near-avascularity contributes heavily to its inability to heal, and places it as a prime candidate for replacement through regenerative medicine. Here, we describe a novel approach to increase extracellular matrix organization, rather than content, in order to augment the mechanical properties of engineered tissue. To synthesize fibrocartilage, we employ a self-assembling process, which is free of exogenous scaffolds and relies on cell-to-cell interactions to form all-biologic constructs. When treated with the signaling phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), tissue constructs displayed increased tensile properties and collagen organization, while total collagen content remained unchanged. LPA-treated constructs exhibited greater DNA content, indicative that the molecule exerted a signaling effect. Furthermore, LPA-treated cells displayed significant cytoskeletal reorganization. We conclude that LPA induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell-matrix traction, which resulted in matrix reorganization and increased tensile properties. This study emphasizes the potential of non-traditional stimuli, such as signaling phospholipids, for use in tissue development studies. The extension of these results to other collagen-rich tissues represents a promising avenue for future exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)133-138
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume433
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 29 2013

Fingerprint

Phospholipids
Fibrocartilage
Tissue
Mechanical properties
Collagen
Tensile properties
Regenerative Medicine
Traction
Biological Products
Scaffolds
Cell Communication
Extracellular Matrix
Knee
Cells
Molecules
lysophosphatidic acid
DNA

Keywords

  • Biomechanics
  • Cell traction
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Knee meniscus
  • Tissue engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Biophysics
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Enhancing the mechanical properties of engineered tissue through matrix remodeling via the signaling phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid. / Hadidi, Pasha; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 433, No. 1, 29.03.2013, p. 133-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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