Enhancing Compassion: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Compassion Cultivation Training Program

Hooria Jazaieri, Geshe Thupten Jinpa, Kelly McGonigal, Erika L. Rosenberg, Joel Finkelstein, Emiliana Simon-Thomas, Margaret Cullen, James R. Doty, James J. Gross, Philip R Goldin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Psychosocial interventions often aim to alleviate negative emotional states. However, there is growing interest in cultivating positive emotional states and qualities. One particular target is compassion, but it is not yet clear whether compassion can be trained. A community sample of 100 adults were randomly assigned to a 9-week compassion cultivation training (CCT) program (n = 60) or a waitlist control condition (n = 40). Before and after this 9-week period, participants completed self-report inventories that measured compassion for others, receiving compassion from others, and self-compassion. Compared to the waitlist control condition, CCT resulted in significant improvements in all three domains of compassion-compassion for others, receiving compassion from others, and self-compassion. The amount of formal meditation practiced during CCT was associated with increased compassion for others. Specific domains of compassion can be intentionally cultivated in a training program. These findings may have important implications for mental health and well-being.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1126
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Happiness Studies
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2013
Externally publishedYes

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training program
psychosocial intervention
meditation
well-being
mental health
community

Keywords

  • Compassion
  • Meditation
  • Self-compassion
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Jazaieri, H., Jinpa, G. T., McGonigal, K., Rosenberg, E. L., Finkelstein, J., Simon-Thomas, E., ... Goldin, P. R. (2013). Enhancing Compassion: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Compassion Cultivation Training Program. Journal of Happiness Studies, 14(4), 1113-1126. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-012-9373-z

Enhancing Compassion : A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Compassion Cultivation Training Program. / Jazaieri, Hooria; Jinpa, Geshe Thupten; McGonigal, Kelly; Rosenberg, Erika L.; Finkelstein, Joel; Simon-Thomas, Emiliana; Cullen, Margaret; Doty, James R.; Gross, James J.; Goldin, Philip R.

In: Journal of Happiness Studies, Vol. 14, No. 4, 08.2013, p. 1113-1126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jazaieri, H, Jinpa, GT, McGonigal, K, Rosenberg, EL, Finkelstein, J, Simon-Thomas, E, Cullen, M, Doty, JR, Gross, JJ & Goldin, PR 2013, 'Enhancing Compassion: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Compassion Cultivation Training Program', Journal of Happiness Studies, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 1113-1126. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-012-9373-z
Jazaieri H, Jinpa GT, McGonigal K, Rosenberg EL, Finkelstein J, Simon-Thomas E et al. Enhancing Compassion: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Compassion Cultivation Training Program. Journal of Happiness Studies. 2013 Aug;14(4):1113-1126. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-012-9373-z
Jazaieri, Hooria ; Jinpa, Geshe Thupten ; McGonigal, Kelly ; Rosenberg, Erika L. ; Finkelstein, Joel ; Simon-Thomas, Emiliana ; Cullen, Margaret ; Doty, James R. ; Gross, James J. ; Goldin, Philip R. / Enhancing Compassion : A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Compassion Cultivation Training Program. In: Journal of Happiness Studies. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 1113-1126.
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