Engagement of the community, traditional leaders, and public health system in the design and implementation of a large community-based, cluster-randomized trial of umbilical cord care in Zambia

Davidson H. Hamer, Julie Herlihy, Kebby Musokotwane, Bowen Banda, Chipo Mpamba, Boyd Mwangelwa, Portipher Pilingana, Donald M. Thea, Jonathon L. Simon, Kojo Yeboah-Antwi, Caroline Grogan, Katherine E.A. Semrau

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conducting research in areas with diverse cultures requires attention to community sensitization and involvement. The process of community engagement is described for a large community-based, cluster-randomized, controlled trial comparing daily 4%chlorhexidine umbilical cord wash to dry cord care for neonatal mortality prevention in Southern Province, Zambia. Study preparations required baseline formative ethnographic research, substantial community sensitization, and engagement with three levels of stakeholders, each necessitating different strategies. Cluster-specific birth notification systems developed with traditional leadership and community members using community-selected data collectors resulted in a post-natal home visit within 48 hours of birth in 96% of births. Of 39,679 pregnant women enrolled (93% of the target of 42,570), only 3.7%were lost to follow-up or withdrew antenatally; 0.2%live-born neonates were lost by day 28 of follow-up. Conducting this trial in close collaboration with traditional, administrative, political, and community stakeholders facilitated excellent study participation, despite structural and sociocultural challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)666-672
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Zambia
Umbilical Cord
Public Health
Parturition
House Calls
Chlorhexidine
Lost to Follow-Up
Infant Mortality
Research
Pregnant Women
Randomized Controlled Trials
Newborn Infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Engagement of the community, traditional leaders, and public health system in the design and implementation of a large community-based, cluster-randomized trial of umbilical cord care in Zambia. / Hamer, Davidson H.; Herlihy, Julie; Musokotwane, Kebby; Banda, Bowen; Mpamba, Chipo; Mwangelwa, Boyd; Pilingana, Portipher; Thea, Donald M.; Simon, Jonathon L.; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Grogan, Caroline; Semrau, Katherine E.A.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 92, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 666-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Hamer, Davidson H. ; Herlihy, Julie ; Musokotwane, Kebby ; Banda, Bowen ; Mpamba, Chipo ; Mwangelwa, Boyd ; Pilingana, Portipher ; Thea, Donald M. ; Simon, Jonathon L. ; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo ; Grogan, Caroline ; Semrau, Katherine E.A. / Engagement of the community, traditional leaders, and public health system in the design and implementation of a large community-based, cluster-randomized trial of umbilical cord care in Zambia. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2015 ; Vol. 92, No. 3. pp. 666-672.
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