Energy expenditure, body composition, and glucose metabolism in lean and obese rhesus monkeys treated with ephedrine and caffeine

Jon J Ramsey, Ricki J. Colman, Andrew G. Swick, Joseph W. Kemnitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The administration of ephedrine and caffeine (E+C) has been proposed to promote weight loss by increasing energy expenditure and decreasing food intake. We tested this hypothesis in six lean (4-9% body fat) and six mildly to moderately obese (13-44% body fat) monkeys studied during a 7-wk control period, an 8-wk drug treatment period, and a 7-wk placebo period. During the drug treatment period, the monkeys were given ephedrine (6 mg) and caffeine (50 mg) orally three times per day. At the end of each period, a glucose tolerance test was performed, energy expenditure was measured, and body composition was determined. Treatment with E+C resulted in a decrease in body weight in the obese animals (P = 0.06). This loss in weight was primarily the result of a 19% reduction in body fat. Drug treatment also resulted in a decrease in body fat in the lean group (P = 0.05). Food intake was reduced by E+C only in the obese group (P <0.05). Nighttime energy expenditure was increased by 21% (P <0.03) in the obese group and 24% (P < 0.01) in the lean group with E+C treatment. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was higher in both groups during drug treatment. E+C did not produce systematic changes in glucoregulatory variables, whereas plasma leptin concentrations decreased in both groups with drug treatment. Overall, these results show that E+C treatment can promote weight loss through an increase in energy expenditure, or in some individuals, a combination of an increase in energy expenditure and a decrease in food intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-51
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume68
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

ephedrine
caffeine
Macaca mulatta
Body Composition
energy expenditure
Energy Metabolism
body composition
drug therapy
Glucose
body fat
glucose
metabolism
Adipose Tissue
food intake
weight loss
Weight Loss
monkeys
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Eating
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Caffeine
  • Ephedrine
  • Glucose
  • Insulin
  • Leptin
  • Oxygen consumption
  • Rhesus monkeys
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Energy expenditure, body composition, and glucose metabolism in lean and obese rhesus monkeys treated with ephedrine and caffeine. / Ramsey, Jon J; Colman, Ricki J.; Swick, Andrew G.; Kemnitz, Joseph W.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 68, No. 1, 1998, p. 42-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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