Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics: Investigation of the underlying mechanisms

Nan Shen, Stavros G. Demos, Raluca A. Negres, Alexander M. Rubenchik, Candace D. Harris, Manyalibo J. Matthews

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Surface particulate contamination on optics can lead to laser-induced damage hence limit the performance of high power laser system. In this work we focus on understanding the fundamental mechanisms that lead to damage initiation by metal contaminants. Using time resolved microscopy and plasma spectroscopy, we studied the dynamic process of ejecting ∼30 μm stainless steel particles from the exit surface of fused silica substrate irradiated with 1064 nm, 10 ns and 355 nm, 8 ns laser pulses. Time-resolved plasma emission spectroscopy was used to characterize the energy coupling and temperature rise associated with single, 10-ns pulsed laser ablation of metallic particles bound to transparent substrates. Plasma associated with Fe(I) emission lines originating from steel microspheres was observe to cool from < 24,000 K to ∼15,000 K over ∼220 ns as τ-0.22, consistent with radiative losses and adiabatic gas expansion of a relatively free plasma. Simultaneous emission lines from Si(II) associated with the plasma etching of the SiO2 substrate were observed yielding higher plasma temperatures, ∼35,000 K, relative to the Fe(I) plasma. The difference in species temperatures is consistent with plasma confinement at the microsphere-substrate interface as the particle is ejected, and is directly visualized using pump-probe shadowgraphy as a function of pulsed laser energy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium Proceedings - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015
PublisherSPIE
Volume9632
ISBN (Electronic)9781628418323
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015 - Boulder, United States
Duration: Sep 27 2015Sep 30 2015

Other

Other47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015
CountryUnited States
CityBoulder
Period9/27/159/30/15

Fingerprint

Cleaning
Silica
Silicon Dioxide
cleaning
Optics
Plasma
Damage
optics
Laser
silicon dioxide
damage
Plasmas
Lasers
lasers
Substrate
Substrates
pulsed lasers
Microspheres
Pulsed lasers
Pulsed Laser

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Mathematics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Shen, N., Demos, S. G., Negres, R. A., Rubenchik, A. M., Harris, C. D., & Matthews, M. J. (2015). Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics: Investigation of the underlying mechanisms. In 47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium Proceedings - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015 (Vol. 9632). [96320V] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2195593

Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics : Investigation of the underlying mechanisms. / Shen, Nan; Demos, Stavros G.; Negres, Raluca A.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Harris, Candace D.; Matthews, Manyalibo J.

47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium Proceedings - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015. Vol. 9632 SPIE, 2015. 96320V.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Shen, N, Demos, SG, Negres, RA, Rubenchik, AM, Harris, CD & Matthews, MJ 2015, Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics: Investigation of the underlying mechanisms. in 47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium Proceedings - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015. vol. 9632, 96320V, SPIE, 47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015, Boulder, United States, 9/27/15. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2195593
Shen N, Demos SG, Negres RA, Rubenchik AM, Harris CD, Matthews MJ. Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics: Investigation of the underlying mechanisms. In 47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium Proceedings - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015. Vol. 9632. SPIE. 2015. 96320V https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2195593
Shen, Nan ; Demos, Stavros G. ; Negres, Raluca A. ; Rubenchik, Alexander M. ; Harris, Candace D. ; Matthews, Manyalibo J. / Energetic laser cleaning of metallic particles and surface damage on silica optics : Investigation of the underlying mechanisms. 47th Annual Laser Damage Symposium Proceedings - Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 2015. Vol. 9632 SPIE, 2015.
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