Employer best practice guidelines for the return to work of workers on mental disorder-related disability leave: A systematic review

Carolyn S Dewa, Lucy Trojanowski, Margot C W Joosen, Sarah Bonato

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: There has been an increasing number of employer best practice guidelines (BPGs) for the return to work (RTW) from mental disorder-related disability leave. This systematic review addresses 2 questions: 1) What is the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs? and 2) What are the areas of agreement and discrepancy among the identified guidelines related to the RTW from mental illness-related disability leave? Method: A systematic literature search was performed using publically available grey literature and best practice portals. It focused on the RTW of workers with medically certified disability leave related to mental disorders. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) was used to assess the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs. Results: A total of 58 unique documents were identified for screening. After screening, 5 BPGs were appraised using AGREE II; 3 BPGs were included in the final set. There were no discrepancies among the 3, although they were from different countries. They all agreed there should be: 1) well-described organizational policies and procedures for the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders, 2) a disability leave plan, and 3) work accommodations. In addition, one guideline suggested supervisor training and mental health literacy training for all staff. Conclusion: Although there were no discrepancies among the 3 BPGs, they emphasized different aspects of RTW and could be considered to be complementary. Together, they provide important guidance for those seeking to understand employer best practices for mental illness-related disability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-185
Number of pages10
JournalCanadian Journal of Psychiatry
Volume61
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sick Leave
Return to Work
Practice Guidelines
Mental Disorders
Guidelines
Organizational Policy
Literature
Health Literacy

Keywords

  • Best practices
  • Mental disorders
  • Return to work
  • Work disability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Employer best practice guidelines for the return to work of workers on mental disorder-related disability leave : A systematic review. / Dewa, Carolyn S; Trojanowski, Lucy; Joosen, Margot C W; Bonato, Sarah.

In: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 61, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 176-185.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7418a1ea4b394db2a04352d20d733433,
title = "Employer best practice guidelines for the return to work of workers on mental disorder-related disability leave: A systematic review",
abstract = "Objective: There has been an increasing number of employer best practice guidelines (BPGs) for the return to work (RTW) from mental disorder-related disability leave. This systematic review addresses 2 questions: 1) What is the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs? and 2) What are the areas of agreement and discrepancy among the identified guidelines related to the RTW from mental illness-related disability leave? Method: A systematic literature search was performed using publically available grey literature and best practice portals. It focused on the RTW of workers with medically certified disability leave related to mental disorders. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) was used to assess the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs. Results: A total of 58 unique documents were identified for screening. After screening, 5 BPGs were appraised using AGREE II; 3 BPGs were included in the final set. There were no discrepancies among the 3, although they were from different countries. They all agreed there should be: 1) well-described organizational policies and procedures for the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders, 2) a disability leave plan, and 3) work accommodations. In addition, one guideline suggested supervisor training and mental health literacy training for all staff. Conclusion: Although there were no discrepancies among the 3 BPGs, they emphasized different aspects of RTW and could be considered to be complementary. Together, they provide important guidance for those seeking to understand employer best practices for mental illness-related disability.",
keywords = "Best practices, Mental disorders, Return to work, Work disability",
author = "Dewa, {Carolyn S} and Lucy Trojanowski and Joosen, {Margot C W} and Sarah Bonato",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0706743716632515",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "61",
pages = "176--185",
journal = "Canadian Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0706-7437",
publisher = "Canadian Psychiatric Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Employer best practice guidelines for the return to work of workers on mental disorder-related disability leave

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Dewa, Carolyn S

AU - Trojanowski, Lucy

AU - Joosen, Margot C W

AU - Bonato, Sarah

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Objective: There has been an increasing number of employer best practice guidelines (BPGs) for the return to work (RTW) from mental disorder-related disability leave. This systematic review addresses 2 questions: 1) What is the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs? and 2) What are the areas of agreement and discrepancy among the identified guidelines related to the RTW from mental illness-related disability leave? Method: A systematic literature search was performed using publically available grey literature and best practice portals. It focused on the RTW of workers with medically certified disability leave related to mental disorders. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) was used to assess the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs. Results: A total of 58 unique documents were identified for screening. After screening, 5 BPGs were appraised using AGREE II; 3 BPGs were included in the final set. There were no discrepancies among the 3, although they were from different countries. They all agreed there should be: 1) well-described organizational policies and procedures for the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders, 2) a disability leave plan, and 3) work accommodations. In addition, one guideline suggested supervisor training and mental health literacy training for all staff. Conclusion: Although there were no discrepancies among the 3 BPGs, they emphasized different aspects of RTW and could be considered to be complementary. Together, they provide important guidance for those seeking to understand employer best practices for mental illness-related disability.

AB - Objective: There has been an increasing number of employer best practice guidelines (BPGs) for the return to work (RTW) from mental disorder-related disability leave. This systematic review addresses 2 questions: 1) What is the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs? and 2) What are the areas of agreement and discrepancy among the identified guidelines related to the RTW from mental illness-related disability leave? Method: A systematic literature search was performed using publically available grey literature and best practice portals. It focused on the RTW of workers with medically certified disability leave related to mental disorders. The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) was used to assess the quality of the development and recommendations of these BPGs. Results: A total of 58 unique documents were identified for screening. After screening, 5 BPGs were appraised using AGREE II; 3 BPGs were included in the final set. There were no discrepancies among the 3, although they were from different countries. They all agreed there should be: 1) well-described organizational policies and procedures for the roles and responsibilities of all stakeholders, 2) a disability leave plan, and 3) work accommodations. In addition, one guideline suggested supervisor training and mental health literacy training for all staff. Conclusion: Although there were no discrepancies among the 3 BPGs, they emphasized different aspects of RTW and could be considered to be complementary. Together, they provide important guidance for those seeking to understand employer best practices for mental illness-related disability.

KW - Best practices

KW - Mental disorders

KW - Return to work

KW - Work disability

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84963994583&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84963994583&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0706743716632515

DO - 10.1177/0706743716632515

M3 - Article

C2 - 27254093

AN - SCOPUS:84963994583

VL - 61

SP - 176

EP - 185

JO - Canadian Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Canadian Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0706-7437

IS - 3

ER -