Emotional responsivity in young children with Williams syndrome

Debbie J. Fidler, Susan L. Hepburn, David E. Most, Amy Philofsky, Sally J Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of Repacholi and Gopnik's (1997) "Yummy-Yucky" task. Results show that children with Williams syndrome were more likely to mimic and/or imitate facial affect and vocalizations than children in the mixed comparison group. Yet, this increased emotional responsivity did not substantially improve decision-making based on the affective display; children with Williams syndrome were more likely to attempt to convince the experimenter that the disliked food was likable. Implications of a social profile that includes enhanced emotional responsivity paired with impaired perspective taking are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)194-206
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume112
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Williams Syndrome
Developmental Disabilities
Disabled Children
disability
Decision Making
Young children
Emotion
Responsivity
etiology
Food
food
decision making

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Emotional responsivity in young children with Williams syndrome. / Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

In: American Journal on Mental Retardation, Vol. 112, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 194-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fidler, Debbie J. ; Hepburn, Susan L. ; Most, David E. ; Philofsky, Amy ; Rogers, Sally J. / Emotional responsivity in young children with Williams syndrome. In: American Journal on Mental Retardation. 2007 ; Vol. 112, No. 3. pp. 194-206.
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