Emergency Medicine Research Directors and Research Programs: Characteristics and Factors Associated with Productivity

David J. Karras, Linda K. Kruus, Brigitte M. Baumann, John J. Cienki, Michelle Blanda, Susan A. Stern, Edward A Panacek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Periodic surveys of research directors (RDs) in emergency medicine (EM) are useful to assess the specialty's development and evolution of the RD role. Objectives: To assess associations between characteristics and research productivity of RDs and EM programs. Methods: A survey of EM RDs was developed using the nominal group technique and pilot tested. RDs or surrogate respondents at programs certified by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were contacted by e-mail in early 2005. The survey assessed programs' research infrastructure and productivity, as well as RD characteristics, responsibilities, and career satisfaction. Three measures of research productivity were empirically defined: research publications, grant awards, and grant revenue. Results: Responses were received from 86% of 123 EM programs. Productivity was associated with the presence of nonclinical faculty, dedicated research coordinators, and reduced clinical hours for research faculty. Programs with an RD did not have greater research productivity, using any measure, than those without an RD. The majority of RDs cited pursuing their own studies, obtaining funding, research mentoring, and research administration to be major responsibilities. The majority characterized internal research funding, grant development support, and support from other faculty as inadequate. Most RDs are satisfied with their careers and expect to remain in the position for three or more years. Conclusions: Research productivity of EM residency programs is associated with the presence of dedicated research faculty and staff and with reduced clinical demands for research faculty. Despite perceiving deficiencies in important resources, most RDs are professionally satisfied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-644
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Emergency Medicine
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Keywords

  • emergency medicine research education
  • graduate internship and residency questionnaires time factors
  • medical

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Emergency Medicine Research Directors and Research Programs : Characteristics and Factors Associated with Productivity. / Karras, David J.; Kruus, Linda K.; Baumann, Brigitte M.; Cienki, John J.; Blanda, Michelle; Stern, Susan A.; Panacek, Edward A.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 637-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karras, David J. ; Kruus, Linda K. ; Baumann, Brigitte M. ; Cienki, John J. ; Blanda, Michelle ; Stern, Susan A. ; Panacek, Edward A. / Emergency Medicine Research Directors and Research Programs : Characteristics and Factors Associated with Productivity. In: Academic Emergency Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 13, No. 6. pp. 637-644.
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