Elevation of plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) immunoreactivity by fat, protein, and amino acids in the cat, a carnivore

Robert C. Backus, Grace L. Rosenquist, Quinton R. Rogers, John Calam, James G. Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cat requires a diet high in protein and certain nutrients that are found only in animal tissue. It is possible that secretogogues of intestinal CCK in the cat may be different from those observed in non-carnivorous species. Plasma CCK concentrations were determined in cats (n = 6) given by oral-gastric tube either casein, whey protein, corn oil, or corn starch suspended in water. CCK was measured by RIA with a tyrosine sulfate-specific, C-terminal antibody, DINO. HPLC of plasma revealed that most CCK-immunoreactivity (CCK-LI) was associated with CCK-33 and a late eluting peak, presumably CCK-58. Casein, whey protein, and corn oil increased (P < 0.05) post-administration plasma CCK-LI, and at least for casein, the effect was dose related. An amino acid mixture approximating the residue composition of casein increased plasma CCK-LI (P < 0.05), however, the increase tended to be less than that caused by casein. Evaluation of post-administration levels of plasma amino acids indicated that intact protein and amino acids in the intestinal lumen affect CCK release by different mechanisms. Collectively, the results indicated that although cats are carnivores cats and humans secrete CCK in response to the same nutrients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-131
Number of pages9
JournalRegulatory Peptides
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 30 1995

Fingerprint

Cholecystokinin
Cats
Fats
Plasmas
Amino Acids
Caseins
Proteins
Corn Oil
Nutrients
Food
Nutrition
Starch
Zea mays
Stomach
Animals
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography
Tissue
Diet
Water
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Casein
  • Cat
  • CCK
  • Plasma amino acid
  • Radioimmunoassay
  • Starch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Elevation of plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) immunoreactivity by fat, protein, and amino acids in the cat, a carnivore. / Backus, Robert C.; Rosenquist, Grace L.; Rogers, Quinton R.; Calam, John; Morris, James G.

In: Regulatory Peptides, Vol. 57, No. 2, 30.05.1995, p. 123-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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