Electrophysiological signs of split-second decision-making

David L Woods, Steven A. Hillyard, Eric Courchesne, Robert Galambos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When young adults detected auditory stimuli at split-second intervals, different components of the event-related brain potentials showed markedly different speeds of recovery. The P3 component (latency 300 to 350 milliseconds) was fully recovered at intervals of less than 1.0 second, while the N1-P2 components (latencies 100 to 180 milliseconds) were markedly attenuated with stimulus repetition even at longer interstimulus intervals. Thus, the N1-P2 recovers much more slowly than a subject's ability to evaluate signals, whereas the P3 appears to be generated at the same high rates as the decision processes with which it is associated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)655-657
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume207
Issue number4431
StatePublished - 1980

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Aptitude
Evoked Potentials
Young Adult
Decision Making
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Woods, D. L., Hillyard, S. A., Courchesne, E., & Galambos, R. (1980). Electrophysiological signs of split-second decision-making. Science, 207(4431), 655-657.

Electrophysiological signs of split-second decision-making. / Woods, David L; Hillyard, Steven A.; Courchesne, Eric; Galambos, Robert.

In: Science, Vol. 207, No. 4431, 1980, p. 655-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Woods, DL, Hillyard, SA, Courchesne, E & Galambos, R 1980, 'Electrophysiological signs of split-second decision-making', Science, vol. 207, no. 4431, pp. 655-657.
Woods DL, Hillyard SA, Courchesne E, Galambos R. Electrophysiological signs of split-second decision-making. Science. 1980;207(4431):655-657.
Woods, David L ; Hillyard, Steven A. ; Courchesne, Eric ; Galambos, Robert. / Electrophysiological signs of split-second decision-making. In: Science. 1980 ; Vol. 207, No. 4431. pp. 655-657.
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