Electromyographic (EMG) amplitude patterns in the proximal and distal compartments of the cat semitendinosus during various motor tasks

Diane L. Hutchison, Roland R. Roy, Sue Bodine-Fowler, John A. Hodgson, V. Reggie Edgerton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

The electromyographic (EMG) signals recorded from the proximal (STp) and distal (STd) compartments of the cat semitendinosus muscle (ST) during treadmill running at various speeds, jumping and paw-shaking were quantified to assess the degree of independence of neural control of the two portions of the muscle. Five adult cats were implanted with intramuscular electrodes in the STp and STd. Raw EMG signals were sampled, rectified and a modified form of their running average was used to calculate the mean EMG every 20 ms. EMG amplitudes of each portion of the muscle were plotted and their relative density distributions were generated. The relative density distribution was used to represent a measure of the probability of any two amplitudes occuring simultaneously (i.e. joint probability density distribution). Based on the probability density distributions of the EMG signals from different movements, the patterns of recruitment from the STp and STd were similar. However, during jumping and paw shaking, two relatively vigorous tasks, some deviations in the pattern were apparent. These data, therefore, suggest that the two ends of the ST are subjected to similar, but not identical, control mechanisms during the motor tasks studied.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-64
Number of pages9
JournalBrain Research
Volume479
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 6 1989

Keywords

  • Compartmentalization
  • Intramuscular electromyography
  • Jumping
  • Motor control
  • Paw shake
  • Semitendinosus
  • Treadmill locomotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

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