Electrodiagnostic evaluation of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies

Gregory T. Carter, John D. England, Thomas W. Hecht, Jay J. Han, Patrick Weydt, Phillip F. Chance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrodiagnosis can classify hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) into two basic types: primarily demyelinating with secondary axonal loss and primarily axonal. For the most part, the various forms of HMSN show uniform symmetric nerve conduction slowing, in contrast to acquired neuropathies, which may be multifocal with nonuniform conduction velocity slowing and temporal dispersion. Nevertheless, there are exceptions. This article reviews the available literature and describes the electrodiagnostic approach to HMSN, detailing potential sources of error that can lead to misinterpretation of data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-363
Number of pages17
JournalPhysical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Hereditary Sensory and Motor Neuropathy
Electrodiagnosis
Neural Conduction
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Electrodiagnostic evaluation of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. / Carter, Gregory T.; England, John D.; Hecht, Thomas W.; Han, Jay J.; Weydt, Patrick; Chance, Phillip F.

In: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America, Vol. 14, No. 2, 05.2003, p. 347-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carter, Gregory T. ; England, John D. ; Hecht, Thomas W. ; Han, Jay J. ; Weydt, Patrick ; Chance, Phillip F. / Electrodiagnostic evaluation of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies. In: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America. 2003 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 347-363.
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