Efficacy of metoclopramide for treatment of ileus in horses following small intestinal surgery: 70 cases (1989-1992)

A. J. Dart, J. R. Peauroi, D. R. Hodgson, John Pascoe

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Abstract

In this retrospective study, postoperative ileus was studied in horses having resection of the small intestine followed by a jejunojejunal (n=35) or a jejunocaecal (n=35) anastomosis. Twenty-six horses received no metoclopramide, 27 received metoclopramide as an intermittent intravenous infusion and 17 horses received metoclopramide as a continuous intravenous infusion (0.04 mg/kg/hour). Horses receiving a continuous infusion of metoclopramide had a reduced total volume (P< 0.001), shorter duration (P< 0.001), and a slower rate (P< 0.001) of postoperative gastric reflux, and a shorter post-operative hospital stay (P< 0.01) when compared to horses receiving no metoclopramide and horses receiving metoclopramide as an intermittent infusion. Horses having jejunocaecostomy performed had a larger volume (P< 0.05), longer duration (P< 0.05), and a greater rate (P< 0.05) of postoperative gastric reflux, and a longer postoperative hospital stay (P< 0.001) than horses undergoing jejunojejunostomy. Horses that had an abdominal drain placed during surgery had a longer length of intestine resected (P< 0.05) and a longer postoperative hospital stay (P< 0.05) than horses without an abdominal drain. Horses that died or were euthanased during the postoperative period had a greater total volume (P< 0.05), longer duration (P< 0.05), and greater rate of postoperative gastric reflux (P< 0.01), a longer length of small intestine resected (P< 0.01), and a shorter postoperative hospital stay (P< 0.05) than horses that survived until discharge from the hospital. In a multivariate regression analysis the continuous infusion of metoclopramide was the only variable that contributed significantly to predicting the total volume (P< 0.001; r2 = 0.24), duration (P< 0.001; r2 = 0.24) and rate (P< 0.001; r2 = 0.25) of postoperative gastric reflux. We concluded that metoclopramide given as a continuous intravenous infusion decreased the incidence and severity of ileus following small intestinal resection and anastomosis in horses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)280-284
Number of pages5
JournalAustralian Veterinary Journal
Volume74
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

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metoclopramide
Metoclopramide
Ileus
intestinal obstruction
Horses
surgery
horses
Length of Stay
Stomach
stomach
Intravenous Infusions
duration
resection
Small Intestine
small intestine
retrospective studies
Postoperative Period

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Efficacy of metoclopramide for treatment of ileus in horses following small intestinal surgery : 70 cases (1989-1992). / Dart, A. J.; Peauroi, J. R.; Hodgson, D. R.; Pascoe, John.

In: Australian Veterinary Journal, Vol. 74, No. 4, 01.01.1996, p. 280-284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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