Efficacy of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease who are taking propranolol

L. J. Laslett, L. Paumer, P. Scott Baier, Ezra A Amsterdam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of β-adrenergic blockade on the efficacy of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease were assessed in a community-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Twenty-five patients took no β-adrenergic-blocking agent and 17 patients took a constant dose of propranolol during the 3 month study period. Individual exercise prescription consisted of an intensity of 70% of maximal workload monitored by heart rate, performed 20 min each session, three sessions per week. Both groups improved in maximal exercise capacity: from 8.7 ± 1.90 (mean ± SD) to 9.7 ± 2.1 mets (p < .01) in those not taking propranolol and from 6.6 ± 1.5 to 7.7 ± 1.8 mets (p < .01) in those taking the drug. At a workload of 70% of maximal achieved at pretraining testing, heart rate decreased with training from 123 ± 19 to 113 ± 17 beats/min (p < .01) in those not taking propranolol and from 97 ± 14 to 92 ± 12 beats/min (p < .05) in those taking the drug. At a workload of 85% of pretraining maximum, heart rate similarly was lowered with training from 138 ± 17 to 126 ± 17 beats/min (p < .01) in those not taking a β-blocker and from 107 ± 13 to 102 ± 13 beats/min (p < .02) in those taking propranolol. Thus patients with coronary disease who take propranolol have the same potential to benefit from physical training as patients who do not take β-blockers, and exercise does not need to be modified because of the drug.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1029-1034
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation
Volume68
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1983

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Propranolol
Coronary Artery Disease
Exercise
Workload
Heart Rate
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Adrenergic Antagonists
Adrenergic Agents
Prescriptions
Coronary Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Efficacy of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease who are taking propranolol. / Laslett, L. J.; Paumer, L.; Scott Baier, P.; Amsterdam, Ezra A.

In: Circulation, Vol. 68, No. 5, 1983, p. 1029-1034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laslett, L. J. ; Paumer, L. ; Scott Baier, P. ; Amsterdam, Ezra A. / Efficacy of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease who are taking propranolol. In: Circulation. 1983 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 1029-1034.
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abstract = "The effects of β-adrenergic blockade on the efficacy of exercise training in patients with coronary artery disease were assessed in a community-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Twenty-five patients took no β-adrenergic-blocking agent and 17 patients took a constant dose of propranolol during the 3 month study period. Individual exercise prescription consisted of an intensity of 70{\%} of maximal workload monitored by heart rate, performed 20 min each session, three sessions per week. Both groups improved in maximal exercise capacity: from 8.7 ± 1.90 (mean ± SD) to 9.7 ± 2.1 mets (p < .01) in those not taking propranolol and from 6.6 ± 1.5 to 7.7 ± 1.8 mets (p < .01) in those taking the drug. At a workload of 70{\%} of maximal achieved at pretraining testing, heart rate decreased with training from 123 ± 19 to 113 ± 17 beats/min (p < .01) in those not taking propranolol and from 97 ± 14 to 92 ± 12 beats/min (p < .05) in those taking the drug. At a workload of 85{\%} of pretraining maximum, heart rate similarly was lowered with training from 138 ± 17 to 126 ± 17 beats/min (p < .01) in those not taking a β-blocker and from 107 ± 13 to 102 ± 13 beats/min (p < .02) in those taking propranolol. Thus patients with coronary disease who take propranolol have the same potential to benefit from physical training as patients who do not take β-blockers, and exercise does not need to be modified because of the drug.",
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