Efficacy of a streptomycin-dependent, live Pasteurella haemolytica vaccine against challenge exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica in cattle.

Myra Blanchard, M. K. Ashfaq, W. L. Kadel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A streptomycin-dependent, live Pasteurella haemolytica vaccine was given in 1 or 2 doses to 2 groups of weaned calves; 2 other groups of calves were not vaccinated. All calves in the vaccinated groups and calves in 1 of the nonvaccinated groups were stressed by transport, intratracheally inoculated with bovine herpesvirus type-1 (Cooper strain), and then intratracheally inoculated with P haemolytica type A1. The 4th group of calves (nonvaccinated controls) was not stressed and were not intratracheally inoculated with virus or bacteria. Mean daily weight gains, total clinical sign scores, lung lesion scores, plasma fibrinogen concentrations, and antibody titers against P haemolytica were determined at various intervals. Calves that had been vaccinated twice had greater mean daily weight gains and lower total clinical sign scores and lung lesion scores than did nonvaccinated, challenge-exposed calves, but the difference was not significant (P greater than 0.05). Calves vaccinated once had the greatest mean daily weight gains, the lowest total clinical sign scores, and the lowest lung lesion scores when compared with the other 2 challenge-exposed groups of calves. Mean daily weight gains and total clinical sign scores of calves vaccinated once were significantly different (P less than 0.05) than those of calves vaccinated twice. Nonvaccinated, nonchallenge-exposed control calves did not develop clinical signs of disease, did not develop lung lesions, and had consistently positive daily weight gains, and had scores in these areas that were significantly different (P less than 0.05) from those of all challenge-exposed groups of calves. Increases in plasma fibrinogen concentrations corresponded to infection with P haemolytica.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)637-642
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume48
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

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Mannheimia haemolytica
Streptomycin
streptomycin
Weight Gain
Vaccines
calves
vaccines
cattle
Lung
Fibrinogen
lesions (animal)
weight gain
Bovine Herpesvirus 1
lungs
fibrinogen
Viruses
Bacteria
Antibodies
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Efficacy of a streptomycin-dependent, live Pasteurella haemolytica vaccine against challenge exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica in cattle. / Blanchard, Myra; Ashfaq, M. K.; Kadel, W. L.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 48, No. 4, 01.04.1987, p. 637-642.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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