Effects of video-based, online education on behavioral and knowledge outcomes in sunscreen use: A randomized controlled trial

April W. Armstrong, Nayla Z. Idriss, Randie H. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To compare online video and pamphlet education at improving patient comprehension and adherence to sunscreen use, and to assess patient satisfaction with the two educational approaches. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 94 participants received either online, video-based education or pamphlet-based education that described the importance and proper use of sunscreen. Sun protective knowledge and sunscreen application behaviors were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks after group-specific intervention. Results: Participants in both groups had similar levels of baseline sunscreen knowledge. Post-study analysis revealed significantly greater improvement in the knowledge scores from video group members compared to the pamphlet group (p=. 0.003). More importantly, video group participants reported greater sunscreen adherence (p< 0.001). Finally, the video group rated their education vehicle more useful and appealing than the pamphlet group (p< 0.001), and video group participants referred to the video more frequently (p=. 0.018). Conclusion: Video-based learning is a more effective educational tool for teaching sun protective knowledge and encouraging sunscreen use than written materials. Practice implications: More effective patient educational methods to encourage sun protection activities, such as regular sunscreen use, have the potential to increase awareness and foster positive, preventative health behaviors against skin cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-277
Number of pages5
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Sunscreening Agents
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pamphlets
Education
Solar System
Health Behavior
Skin Neoplasms
Patient Compliance
Patient Satisfaction
Teaching
Learning

Keywords

  • Dermatology
  • Education
  • Patient education
  • Sun protection
  • Sunscreen
  • Sunscreen behavior
  • Video

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of video-based, online education on behavioral and knowledge outcomes in sunscreen use : A randomized controlled trial. / Armstrong, April W.; Idriss, Nayla Z.; Kim, Randie H.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 83, No. 2, 05.2011, p. 273-277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a7395a9ee0ce458fa3df4a27c95e4108,
title = "Effects of video-based, online education on behavioral and knowledge outcomes in sunscreen use: A randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Objectives: To compare online video and pamphlet education at improving patient comprehension and adherence to sunscreen use, and to assess patient satisfaction with the two educational approaches. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 94 participants received either online, video-based education or pamphlet-based education that described the importance and proper use of sunscreen. Sun protective knowledge and sunscreen application behaviors were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks after group-specific intervention. Results: Participants in both groups had similar levels of baseline sunscreen knowledge. Post-study analysis revealed significantly greater improvement in the knowledge scores from video group members compared to the pamphlet group (p=. 0.003). More importantly, video group participants reported greater sunscreen adherence (p< 0.001). Finally, the video group rated their education vehicle more useful and appealing than the pamphlet group (p< 0.001), and video group participants referred to the video more frequently (p=. 0.018). Conclusion: Video-based learning is a more effective educational tool for teaching sun protective knowledge and encouraging sunscreen use than written materials. Practice implications: More effective patient educational methods to encourage sun protection activities, such as regular sunscreen use, have the potential to increase awareness and foster positive, preventative health behaviors against skin cancers.",
keywords = "Dermatology, Education, Patient education, Sun protection, Sunscreen, Sunscreen behavior, Video",
author = "Armstrong, {April W.} and Idriss, {Nayla Z.} and Kim, {Randie H.}",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2010.04.033",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "83",
pages = "273--277",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of video-based, online education on behavioral and knowledge outcomes in sunscreen use

T2 - A randomized controlled trial

AU - Armstrong, April W.

AU - Idriss, Nayla Z.

AU - Kim, Randie H.

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - Objectives: To compare online video and pamphlet education at improving patient comprehension and adherence to sunscreen use, and to assess patient satisfaction with the two educational approaches. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 94 participants received either online, video-based education or pamphlet-based education that described the importance and proper use of sunscreen. Sun protective knowledge and sunscreen application behaviors were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks after group-specific intervention. Results: Participants in both groups had similar levels of baseline sunscreen knowledge. Post-study analysis revealed significantly greater improvement in the knowledge scores from video group members compared to the pamphlet group (p=. 0.003). More importantly, video group participants reported greater sunscreen adherence (p< 0.001). Finally, the video group rated their education vehicle more useful and appealing than the pamphlet group (p< 0.001), and video group participants referred to the video more frequently (p=. 0.018). Conclusion: Video-based learning is a more effective educational tool for teaching sun protective knowledge and encouraging sunscreen use than written materials. Practice implications: More effective patient educational methods to encourage sun protection activities, such as regular sunscreen use, have the potential to increase awareness and foster positive, preventative health behaviors against skin cancers.

AB - Objectives: To compare online video and pamphlet education at improving patient comprehension and adherence to sunscreen use, and to assess patient satisfaction with the two educational approaches. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, 94 participants received either online, video-based education or pamphlet-based education that described the importance and proper use of sunscreen. Sun protective knowledge and sunscreen application behaviors were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks after group-specific intervention. Results: Participants in both groups had similar levels of baseline sunscreen knowledge. Post-study analysis revealed significantly greater improvement in the knowledge scores from video group members compared to the pamphlet group (p=. 0.003). More importantly, video group participants reported greater sunscreen adherence (p< 0.001). Finally, the video group rated their education vehicle more useful and appealing than the pamphlet group (p< 0.001), and video group participants referred to the video more frequently (p=. 0.018). Conclusion: Video-based learning is a more effective educational tool for teaching sun protective knowledge and encouraging sunscreen use than written materials. Practice implications: More effective patient educational methods to encourage sun protection activities, such as regular sunscreen use, have the potential to increase awareness and foster positive, preventative health behaviors against skin cancers.

KW - Dermatology

KW - Education

KW - Patient education

KW - Sun protection

KW - Sunscreen

KW - Sunscreen behavior

KW - Video

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79953177483&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79953177483&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2010.04.033

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2010.04.033

M3 - Article

C2 - 20570081

AN - SCOPUS:79953177483

VL - 83

SP - 273

EP - 277

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 2

ER -