Effects of type of fat in the diet on iron bioavailability assessed in suckling and weanling rats

M. L. Pabón, B. Lönnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Differences in iron bioavailability from human milk and milk formulas may in part be due to differences in lipid composition. We investigated the short and long term effects of diets based on different fats [corn, coconut, olive, or soy oil, human milk fat (HMF) and a formula fat blend (FF)] on iron absorption in rats. Suckling rat pups dosed with 59Fe-labeled diets containing different fat sources were killed after 6 h, and blood and individual tissues were counted. Iron availability was estimated by % 59Fe in blood. Pups dosed with a more saturated fat (coconut oil) had a higher % 59Fe in blood than those fed other fat sources. Weanling rats were used to determine iron bioavailability from fat sources using both the hemoglobin repletion method and whole body counting. Hemoglobin regeneration was significantly higher for rats fed the HMF diet (8.4 ± 0.5 g/dl) than from the FF diet (6.5±0.6 g/dl) or the corn oil diet (less saturated) (6.4 ± 0.3 g/dl). Rats fed diets based on coconut oil (more saturated) had significantly higher % 59Fe retention (61.6 ± 1.4) than rats fed diets based on FF (49.8 ± 3.4). There was a significant positive association between oleic acid in the diet and oleic acid in the intestinal mucosa (r = 0.95, p < 0.05) and between linoleic acid in the diet and linoleic acid in the intestinal mucosa (r = 0.97, p < 0.05) suggesting that the dietary treatment altered the fatty acid composition of the brush border membrane. Our results suggest that saturated fats may increase iron absorption and that part of this may be achieved by changes in the fatty acid composition of the intestinal mucosa. Hemoglobin regeneration and % 59Fe retention data suggest that differences in iron absorption from infant diets may in part be due to differences in fat composition. Therefore, lipid composition of infant formulas should also be taken into consideration as a factor influencing iron bioavailability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-23
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Nutrition
Biological Availability
Rats
Iron
Fats
Diet
Human Milk
Intestinal Mucosa
Chemical analysis
Hemoglobins
Blood
Linoleic Acid
Oleic Acid
Regeneration
Fatty Acids
Whole-Body Counting
Lipids
Cocos
Infant Formula
Corn Oil

Keywords

  • Dietary fat
  • Human milk
  • Infant formula
  • Iron bioavailability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of type of fat in the diet on iron bioavailability assessed in suckling and weanling rats. / Pabón, M. L.; Lönnerdal, B.

In: Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2001, p. 18-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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