Effects of temperature on emergence and seasonality of West Nile virus in California

David M. Hartley, Chris Barker, Arnaud Le Menach, Tianchan Niu, Holly D. Gaff, William Reisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temperature has played a critical role in the spatiotemporal dynamics of West Nile virus transmission throughout California from its introduction in 2003 through establishment by 2009. We compared two novel mechanistic measures of transmission risk, the temperature-dependent ratio of virus extrinsic incubation period to the mosquito gonotrophic period (BT), and the fundamental reproductive ratio (R0) based on a mathematical model, to analyze spatiotemporal patterns of receptivity to viral amplification. Maps of BT and R0 were created at 20-km scale and compared throughout California to seroconversions in sentinel chicken flocks at half-month intervals. Overall, estimates of BT and R0 agreed with intensity of transmission measured by the frequency of sentinel chicken seroconversions. Mechanistic measures such as these are important for understanding how temperature affects the spatiotemporal dynamics of West Nile virus transmission and for delineating risk estimates useful to inform vector control agency intervention decisions and communicate outbreak potential.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)884-894
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume86
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

Fingerprint

West Nile virus
Temperature
Chickens
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Culicidae
Disease Outbreaks
Theoretical Models
Viruses
Seroconversion
cyhalothrin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Effects of temperature on emergence and seasonality of West Nile virus in California. / Hartley, David M.; Barker, Chris; Le Menach, Arnaud; Niu, Tianchan; Gaff, Holly D.; Reisen, William.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 86, No. 5, 01.05.2012, p. 884-894.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hartley, David M. ; Barker, Chris ; Le Menach, Arnaud ; Niu, Tianchan ; Gaff, Holly D. ; Reisen, William. / Effects of temperature on emergence and seasonality of West Nile virus in California. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2012 ; Vol. 86, No. 5. pp. 884-894.
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