Effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on plasma acylation stimulating protein, leptin and adiponectin: Relationships with Metabolic Outcomes

Reza Rezvani, Katherine Cianflone, John P McGahan, Lars Berglund, Andrew A. Bremer, Nancy L. Keim, Steven C. Griffen, Peter J Havel, Kimber Stanhope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The effects of fructose and glucose consumption on plasma acylation stimulating protein (ASP), adiponectin, and leptin concentrations relative to energy intake, body weight, adiposity, circulating triglycerides, and insulin sensitivity were determined. Design and Methods Thirty two overweight/obese adults consumed glucose-or fructose-sweetened beverages (25% energy requirement) with their ad libitum diets for 8 weeks, followed by sweetened beverage consumption for 2 weeks with a standardized, energy-balanced diet. Plasma variables were measured at baseline, 2, 8, and 10 weeks, and body adiposity and insulin sensitivity at baseline and 10 weeks. Results Fasting and postprandial ASP concentrations increased at 2 and/or 8 weeks. ASP increases correlated with changes in late-evening triglyceride concentrations. At 10 weeks, fasting adiponectin levels decreased in both groups, and decreases were inversely associated with baseline intra-abdominal fat volume. Sugar consumption increased fasting leptin concentrations; increases were associated with body weight changes. The 24-h leptin profiles increased during glucose consumption and decreased during fructose consumption. These changes correlated with changes of 24-h insulin levels. Conclusions The consumption of fructose and glucose beverages induced changes in plasma concentrations of ASP, adiponectin, and leptin. Further study is required to determine if these changes contribute to the metabolic dysfunction observed during fructose consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2471-2480
Number of pages10
JournalObesity
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013

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Adiponectin
Beverages
Leptin
Fructose
Glucose
Fasting
Adiposity
Insulin Resistance
Triglycerides
Diet
Body Weight Changes
Intra-Abdominal Fat
Energy Intake
Body Weight
des-Arg-(77)-complement C3a
Insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on plasma acylation stimulating protein, leptin and adiponectin : Relationships with Metabolic Outcomes. / Rezvani, Reza; Cianflone, Katherine; McGahan, John P; Berglund, Lars; Bremer, Andrew A.; Keim, Nancy L.; Griffen, Steven C.; Havel, Peter J; Stanhope, Kimber.

In: Obesity, Vol. 21, No. 12, 12.2013, p. 2471-2480.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rezvani, Reza ; Cianflone, Katherine ; McGahan, John P ; Berglund, Lars ; Bremer, Andrew A. ; Keim, Nancy L. ; Griffen, Steven C. ; Havel, Peter J ; Stanhope, Kimber. / Effects of sugar-sweetened beverages on plasma acylation stimulating protein, leptin and adiponectin : Relationships with Metabolic Outcomes. In: Obesity. 2013 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 2471-2480.
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