Effects of protein, lipid, or carbohydrate supplementation on hepatic lipid accumulation during rapid weight loss in obese cats.

V. C. Biourge, B. Massat, J. M. Groff, James Morris, Quinton Rogers

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Abstract

Effects of restricted tube-feeding (25% of energy requirements) of protein, lipid, or carbohydrates on body weight loss; hematologic and clinical chemical variables; plasma lipid and amino acid concentrations; nitrogen balance; and hepatic histologic features and lipid concentrations were compared with values in voluntary-fasting cats (control, CON). Twelve obese cats (6.1 +/- 0.1 kg, > 40% above optimal body weight) were randomly assigned to 4 matched treatment groups (n = 3)--protein (PRO), lipid (LIP), carbohydrate (CHO), and CON--and were offered a low-palatability diet for 4 weeks. Cats of the PRO, LIP, and CHO groups were also tube-fed isocaloric amounts (88 kcal of metabolizable energy) of a casein-soybean protein mixture, corn oil, or a dextrin-dextrose mixture, respectively, during the 4 weeks. All cats fasted, rather than eat the low-palatability purified diet. Cats of the PRO group lost weight at a lower rate (P < 0.05) than did cats of other groups. After 4 weeks of fasting, serum alkaline phosphatase activities were higher than reference values in all cats of the CON and LIP groups and in 2 cats of the CHO group. At that time, 1 cat of the LIP group had lethargy, hepatomegaly, and hyperbilirubinemia. Total hepatic lipid and triglyceride concentrations increased in all groups during the study, but the increase was significantly (P < 0.05) less in cats of the PRO group, compared with those of the CON and LIP groups, and those of the CHO group, compared with those of the LIP group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1406-1415
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume55
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 1994

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Weight Loss
Cats
weight loss
Carbohydrates
cats
carbohydrates
Lipids
liver
Liver
lipids
Proteins
proteins
tube feeding
palatability
fasting
Fasting
Body Weight
hyperbilirubinemia
Diet
dextrins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Effects of protein, lipid, or carbohydrate supplementation on hepatic lipid accumulation during rapid weight loss in obese cats. / Biourge, V. C.; Massat, B.; Groff, J. M.; Morris, James; Rogers, Quinton.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 55, No. 10, 01.10.1994, p. 1406-1415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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