Effects of progesterone receptor blockers on human granulosa-luteal cell culture secretion of progesterone, estradiol, and relaxin

Catherine A. Vandevoort, James W. Overstreet, Bill L. Lasley, Dennis R. Stewart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have developed culture methods for human luteinizing granulosa cells (GLC) that support the timely and dynamic secretion of estrogen (estradiol- 17β; E2), progesterone (P4), and relaxin (RIx) in patterns that mimic serum hormone concentrations during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Additional hCG, to simulate rescue of the corpus luteum, prevented the normal decline in GLC hormone production. To test the importance of the P4 receptor in P4 production, GLC were treated in vitro with two P4 receptor antagonists. Human GLC received one of two hCG support protocols: a Baseline group simulating the normal luteal phase or a Rescue group simulating early pregnancy. Baseline and Rescue groups were treated with either RU-486 or HRP2000 either early or late in the cell culture period. The effects of treatments or control on ovarian steroid and peptide hormone production were determined (significant difference was P < 0.05). In the Rescue group, late treatment resulted in an immediate and dramatic decline in E2, P4, and RIx secretion to nearly nondetectable levels within I day after treatment, and hormones remained depressed for the remaining 10 days of culture. In contrast, early treatment resulted in a decline in steroid hormone secretion that returned to control levels within 5 days of cessation of treatment, and RIx secretion was delayed for approximately 5 days more than in controls. The data support the hypothesis that P4 may be a required autocrine factor, not only for its own production but also for the maintenance of full endocrine function of the corpus luteum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-205
Number of pages6
JournalBiology of Reproduction
Volume62
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2000

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Relaxin
Luteal Cells
Granulosa Cells
Progesterone Receptors
Progesterone
Estradiol
Cell Culture Techniques
Hormones
Luteal Phase
Corpus Luteum
Steroids
Mifepristone
Withholding Treatment
Peptide Hormones
Therapeutics
Estrogens
Maintenance
Pregnancy
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Embryology

Cite this

Effects of progesterone receptor blockers on human granulosa-luteal cell culture secretion of progesterone, estradiol, and relaxin. / Vandevoort, Catherine A.; Overstreet, James W.; Lasley, Bill L.; Stewart, Dennis R.

In: Biology of Reproduction, Vol. 62, No. 1, 2000, p. 200-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vandevoort, Catherine A. ; Overstreet, James W. ; Lasley, Bill L. ; Stewart, Dennis R. / Effects of progesterone receptor blockers on human granulosa-luteal cell culture secretion of progesterone, estradiol, and relaxin. In: Biology of Reproduction. 2000 ; Vol. 62, No. 1. pp. 200-205.
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