Effects of phenobarbital administration on results of serum biochemical analyses and adrenocortical function tests in epileptic dogs

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Abstract

Objective: To determine what effects long-term phenobarbital administration to dogs with epilepsy would have on serum biochemical factors and adrenocortical function. Design: Prospective, uncontrolled study. Animals: Five dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Procedure: Serum total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol concentrations and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amiotransferase activities were measured before and 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after initiation of phenobarbital administration. Endogenous ACTH concentration was measured, and ACTH stimulation and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests were performed at the same time. Results: Serum albumin concentration decreased in 4 of 5 dogs, and serum cholesterol concentrations decreased in all 5 dogs over the course of the study. Serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and alanine aminotransferase activities increased over time, and were greater than the upper reference limits in 4 of the 5 dogs by the end of the study. Endogenous ACTH concentration increased in all dogs but remained within reference limits. Plasma ACTH-stimulated aldosterone concentration increased over the course of the study. Plasma cortisol concentration did not suppress, after administration of dexamethasone, in 1 dog after 6 and 12 months of phenobarbital administration. Clinical Implications: Although endogenous ACTH concentration should be normal in dogs receiving phenobarbital, results of ACTH stimulation and dexamethasone suppression tests may be altered. Serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations, and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities may also be abnormal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1305-1307
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume207
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

phenobarbital
Phenobarbital
corticotropin
Dogs
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
dogs
Serum
dexamethasone
testing
Dexamethasone
Alkaline Phosphatase
alkaline phosphatase
epilepsy
Cholesterol
cholesterol
serum albumin
Alanine Transaminase
alanine transaminase
Serum Albumin
Epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: To determine what effects long-term phenobarbital administration to dogs with epilepsy would have on serum biochemical factors and adrenocortical function. Design: Prospective, uncontrolled study. Animals: Five dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Procedure: Serum total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol concentrations and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amiotransferase activities were measured before and 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after initiation of phenobarbital administration. Endogenous ACTH concentration was measured, and ACTH stimulation and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests were performed at the same time. Results: Serum albumin concentration decreased in 4 of 5 dogs, and serum cholesterol concentrations decreased in all 5 dogs over the course of the study. Serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and alanine aminotransferase activities increased over time, and were greater than the upper reference limits in 4 of the 5 dogs by the end of the study. Endogenous ACTH concentration increased in all dogs but remained within reference limits. Plasma ACTH-stimulated aldosterone concentration increased over the course of the study. Plasma cortisol concentration did not suppress, after administration of dexamethasone, in 1 dog after 6 and 12 months of phenobarbital administration. Clinical Implications: Although endogenous ACTH concentration should be normal in dogs receiving phenobarbital, results of ACTH stimulation and dexamethasone suppression tests may be altered. Serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations, and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities may also be abnormal.",
author = "Chauvet, {A. E.} and Feldman, {Edward C} and Kass, {Philip H}",
year = "1995",
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T1 - Effects of phenobarbital administration on results of serum biochemical analyses and adrenocortical function tests in epileptic dogs

AU - Chauvet, A. E.

AU - Feldman, Edward C

AU - Kass, Philip H

PY - 1995

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N2 - Objective: To determine what effects long-term phenobarbital administration to dogs with epilepsy would have on serum biochemical factors and adrenocortical function. Design: Prospective, uncontrolled study. Animals: Five dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Procedure: Serum total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol concentrations and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amiotransferase activities were measured before and 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after initiation of phenobarbital administration. Endogenous ACTH concentration was measured, and ACTH stimulation and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests were performed at the same time. Results: Serum albumin concentration decreased in 4 of 5 dogs, and serum cholesterol concentrations decreased in all 5 dogs over the course of the study. Serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and alanine aminotransferase activities increased over time, and were greater than the upper reference limits in 4 of the 5 dogs by the end of the study. Endogenous ACTH concentration increased in all dogs but remained within reference limits. Plasma ACTH-stimulated aldosterone concentration increased over the course of the study. Plasma cortisol concentration did not suppress, after administration of dexamethasone, in 1 dog after 6 and 12 months of phenobarbital administration. Clinical Implications: Although endogenous ACTH concentration should be normal in dogs receiving phenobarbital, results of ACTH stimulation and dexamethasone suppression tests may be altered. Serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations, and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities may also be abnormal.

AB - Objective: To determine what effects long-term phenobarbital administration to dogs with epilepsy would have on serum biochemical factors and adrenocortical function. Design: Prospective, uncontrolled study. Animals: Five dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Procedure: Serum total protein, albumin, total bilirubin, and cholesterol concentrations and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine amiotransferase activities were measured before and 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after initiation of phenobarbital administration. Endogenous ACTH concentration was measured, and ACTH stimulation and low-dose dexamethasone suppression tests were performed at the same time. Results: Serum albumin concentration decreased in 4 of 5 dogs, and serum cholesterol concentrations decreased in all 5 dogs over the course of the study. Serum alkaline phosphatase concentration and alanine aminotransferase activities increased over time, and were greater than the upper reference limits in 4 of the 5 dogs by the end of the study. Endogenous ACTH concentration increased in all dogs but remained within reference limits. Plasma ACTH-stimulated aldosterone concentration increased over the course of the study. Plasma cortisol concentration did not suppress, after administration of dexamethasone, in 1 dog after 6 and 12 months of phenobarbital administration. Clinical Implications: Although endogenous ACTH concentration should be normal in dogs receiving phenobarbital, results of ACTH stimulation and dexamethasone suppression tests may be altered. Serum albumin and cholesterol concentrations, and serum alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase activities may also be abnormal.

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