Effects of nonpurified and choline supplemented or nonsupplemented purified diets on hepatic steatosis and methionine metabolism in C3H Mice

Raisa Syed, Noreene M. Shibata, Kusum K. Kharbanda, Ruijun J. Su, Kristin A Olson, Amy Yokoyama, John C Rutledge, Kenneth J. Chmiel, Kyoungmi Kim, Charles H. Halsted, Valentina Medici

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Previous studies indicated that nonpurified and purified commercially available control murine diets have different metabolic effects with potential consequences on hepatic methionine metabolism and liver histology. Methods: We compared the metabolic and histological effects of commercial nonpurified (13% calories from fat; 57% calories from carbohydrates with 38 grams/kg of sucrose) and purified control diets (12% calories from fat; 69% calories from carbohydrates with ∼500 grams/kg of sucrose) with or without choline supplementation administered to C3H mice with normal lipid and methionine metabolism. Diets were started 2 weeks before mating, continued through pregnancy and lactation, and continued in offspring until 24 weeks of age when we collected plasma and liver tissue to study methionine and lipid metabolism. Results: Compared to mice fed nonpurified diets, the liver/body weight ratio was significantly higher in mice fed either purified diet, which was associated with hepatic steatosis and inflammation. Plasma alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in mice receiving the purified diets. The hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) ratio was higher in female mice fed purified compared to nonpurified diet (4.6 ± 2 vs. 2.8 ± 1.9; P < 0.05). Choline supplementation was associated with improvement of some parameters of lipid and methionine metabolism in mice fed purified diets. Conclusions: Standard nonpurified and purified diets have significantly different effects on development of steatosis in control mice. These findings can help in development of animal models of fatty liver and in choosing appropriate laboratory control diets for control animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-209
Number of pages8
JournalMetabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Internal Medicine

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