Effects of neighborhood resources on aggressive and delinquent behaviors among urban youths

Beth E. Molnar, Magdalena Cerda, Andrea L. Roberts, Stephen L. Buka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We sought to identify neighborhood-level resources associated with lower levels of aggression and delinquency among youths aged 9-15 years at baseline after accounting for risk factors and other types of resources. Methods. Data were derived from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, which focused on 2226 ethnically diverse, urban youths, their caregivers, and the 80 neighborhoods in which they resided at baseline. Results. Living in a neighborhood with a higher concentration of organizations or services serving young people and adults was associated with lower levels of aggression (odds ratio [OR]=0.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.8, 1.0); living in such a neighborhood also moderated family, peer, and mentor resources. For example, the presence of well-behaved peers was associated with lower levels of aggression among youths living in neighborhoods where the concentration of organizations and services was at least 1 standard deviation above the mean; the association was less strong among youths living in neighborhoods with organizations and services 1 standard deviation below the mean or less. Conclusions. Certain family, peer, and mentoring resources may confer benefits only in the presence of neighborhood resources. Increasing neighborhood resources should be considered in interventions designed to reduce urban youths' involvement in violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1086-1093
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume98
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Aggression
Organizations
Mentors
Human Development
Violence
Caregivers
Young Adult
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of neighborhood resources on aggressive and delinquent behaviors among urban youths. / Molnar, Beth E.; Cerda, Magdalena; Roberts, Andrea L.; Buka, Stephen L.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 98, No. 6, 01.06.2008, p. 1086-1093.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Molnar, Beth E. ; Cerda, Magdalena ; Roberts, Andrea L. ; Buka, Stephen L. / Effects of neighborhood resources on aggressive and delinquent behaviors among urban youths. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2008 ; Vol. 98, No. 6. pp. 1086-1093.
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