Effects of Mu opioid agonist and antagonist on neurological outcome following traumatic brain injury in the rat

Bruce G Lyeth, J. Y. Jiang, Q. Z. Gong, R. J. Hamm, H. F. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examined the effects of an exogenous mu opioid agonist and antagonist on systemic physiology and neurological outcome following TBI in the rat. Experiment I: [D-Ala2,NMe-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1 nMol or 0.3 nMol in 5μl) (n = 10) or artificial CSF (n = 10) was administered 5 min prior to fluid-percussion brain injury (2.1 atmospheres). Motor performance was assessed on days 1-5 after TBI. The mu receptor agonist, DAMGO significantly reduced both beam-walking latency and body weight loss after injury (p < 0.05). DAMGO-treated rats (n = 5) did not differ from CSF-treated rats (n = 5) on either systemic arterial blood pressure or heart rate responses to injury. Experiment II: Beta-funaltrexamine (β-FNA) (20.0 nMol in 5.0 μl) (n = 10) or artificial CSF (n = 10) was administered (icv) to rats 5 min prior to fluid-percussion brain injury (1.8 atmospheres). Motor performance was assessed on days 1-5 after TBI. The mu receptor antagonist, β-FNA, significantly increased beam-walking latency after injury (p < 0.05). β-FNA-treated rats (n = 5) did not differ from CSF-treated rats (n = 5) on either systemic arterial blood pressure or heart rate responses to injury. Experiment III: Neither β-FNA nor DAMGO affected motor performance in uninjured rats. These results suggest that activation of mu opioid receptors by exogenous agonists may provide protection against deficits in motor performance produced by fluid percussion brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-19
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropeptides
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Narcotic Antagonists
Opioid Analgesics
Rats
Brain
Enkephalins
Percussion
mu Opioid Receptor
Brain Injuries
beta-funaltrexamine
Blood pressure
Wounds and Injuries
Atmosphere
Walking
Fluids
Arterial Pressure
Heart Rate
Experiments
Physiology
Traumatic Brain Injury
Weight Loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Effects of Mu opioid agonist and antagonist on neurological outcome following traumatic brain injury in the rat. / Lyeth, Bruce G; Jiang, J. Y.; Gong, Q. Z.; Hamm, R. J.; Young, H. F.

In: Neuropeptides, Vol. 29, No. 1, 1995, p. 11-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyeth, Bruce G ; Jiang, J. Y. ; Gong, Q. Z. ; Hamm, R. J. ; Young, H. F. / Effects of Mu opioid agonist and antagonist on neurological outcome following traumatic brain injury in the rat. In: Neuropeptides. 1995 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 11-19.
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