Effects of marginal zinc deficiency on microtubule polymerization in the developing rat brain

Patricia I. Oteiza, Lucille S. Hurley, Bo Lönnerdal, Carl L Keen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the possible mechanisms that has been proposed to underlie the deleterious effects of zinc deficiency on brain development is an impairment in the normal formation of the cytoskeletal network. In the current study, in vivo microtubule polymerization was characterized in brain supernatant fluids, from 20-d-old pups whose dams were fed diets containing control (50 μg zinc/g) or marginal levels of zinc (10 μg zinc/g) throughout pregnancy and lactation. Pup brain and body weights were similar between the groups; however, plasma zinc concentrations were lower (27%) in pups fed the marginal zinc diet than in controls. Tubulin concentrations in 100,000g brain supernates were similar between the groups; however, tubulin polymerization in the brain supernates was significantly lower in pups fed the marginal zinc diet compared to controls. Primarily, the early events of polymerization were affected; the lag period of the reaction was doubled, and the initial velocity was slower (26%) in supernates from pups fed the marginal zinc diet than in controls. These findings support the idea that some of the negative effects of marginal zinc deficiency on brain development and function may be mediated by an alteration in microtubule formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-23
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Trace Element Research
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1990

Fingerprint

Microtubules
Polymerization
Zinc
Rats
Brain
Nutrition
Diet
Tubulin
Lactation
Dams
Body Weight
Plasmas
Pregnancy
Fluids

Keywords

  • development
  • microtubules
  • microtubules and development
  • Zinc
  • zinc deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Effects of marginal zinc deficiency on microtubule polymerization in the developing rat brain. / Oteiza, Patricia I.; Hurley, Lucille S.; Lönnerdal, Bo; Keen, Carl L.

In: Biological Trace Element Research, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.1990, p. 13-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oteiza, Patricia I. ; Hurley, Lucille S. ; Lönnerdal, Bo ; Keen, Carl L. / Effects of marginal zinc deficiency on microtubule polymerization in the developing rat brain. In: Biological Trace Element Research. 1990 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 13-23.
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