Effects of ketamine, propofol, or thiopental administration on intraocular pressure and qualities of induction of and recovery from anesthesia in horses

Tatiana H. Ferreira, Robert J Brosnan, Yael Shilo-Benjamini, Stephanie B. Moore, Steven R Hollingsworth

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Abstract

Objective-To assess the effects of ketamine hydrochloride, propofol, or compounded thiopental sodium administration on intraocular pressure (IOP) and qualities of induction of and recovery from anesthesia in horses. Animals-6 healthy adult horses. Procedures-Horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg), and anesthesia was induced with guaifenesin followed by ketamine (2 mg/kg), propofol (3 mg/kg), or thiopental (4 mg/kg) in a crossover study with ≥ 1 week between treatments. For each horse, IOP in the right eye was measured with a handheld applanation tonometer before and after xylazine administration, at the time of recumbency, and every 3 minutes after induction of anesthesia until spontaneous movement was observed. Cardiorespiratory responses and venous blood measurements were recorded during anesthesia. Induction of and recovery from anesthesia were subjectively evaluated by investigators who were unaware of the anesthetic treatment of each horse. Data were analyzed via a repeated-measures ANOVA with Holm-Šidák post hoc comparisons. Results-Compared with findings after xylazine administration (mean ± SD, 17 ± 3 mm Hg), thiopental decreased IOP by 4 ± 23%, whereas propofol and ketamine increased IOP by 8 ± 11% and 37 ± 16%, respectively. Compared with the effects of ketamine, propofol and thiopental resulted in significantly lower IOP at the time of recumbency and higher heart rates at 3 minutes after induction of anesthesia. No other significant differences among treatments were found. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-These findings support the use of thiopental or pro-pofol in preference to ketamine for horses in which increases in IOP should be minimized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1070-1077
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume74
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

Fingerprint

thiopental
Thiopental
Ketamine
ketamine
Propofol
Intraocular Pressure
Horses
anesthesia
Anesthesia
Xylazine
horses
xylazine
Guaifenesin
guaifenesin
anesthetics
Cross-Over Studies
Anesthetics
heart rate
Analysis of Variance
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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Effects of ketamine, propofol, or thiopental administration on intraocular pressure and qualities of induction of and recovery from anesthesia in horses. / Ferreira, Tatiana H.; Brosnan, Robert J; Shilo-Benjamini, Yael; Moore, Stephanie B.; Hollingsworth, Steven R.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 74, No. 8, 2013, p. 1070-1077.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective-To assess the effects of ketamine hydrochloride, propofol, or compounded thiopental sodium administration on intraocular pressure (IOP) and qualities of induction of and recovery from anesthesia in horses. Animals-6 healthy adult horses. Procedures-Horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride (0.5 mg/kg), and anesthesia was induced with guaifenesin followed by ketamine (2 mg/kg), propofol (3 mg/kg), or thiopental (4 mg/kg) in a crossover study with ≥ 1 week between treatments. For each horse, IOP in the right eye was measured with a handheld applanation tonometer before and after xylazine administration, at the time of recumbency, and every 3 minutes after induction of anesthesia until spontaneous movement was observed. Cardiorespiratory responses and venous blood measurements were recorded during anesthesia. Induction of and recovery from anesthesia were subjectively evaluated by investigators who were unaware of the anesthetic treatment of each horse. Data were analyzed via a repeated-measures ANOVA with Holm-Šid{\'a}k post hoc comparisons. Results-Compared with findings after xylazine administration (mean ± SD, 17 ± 3 mm Hg), thiopental decreased IOP by 4 ± 23{\%}, whereas propofol and ketamine increased IOP by 8 ± 11{\%} and 37 ± 16{\%}, respectively. Compared with the effects of ketamine, propofol and thiopental resulted in significantly lower IOP at the time of recumbency and higher heart rates at 3 minutes after induction of anesthesia. No other significant differences among treatments were found. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-These findings support the use of thiopental or pro-pofol in preference to ketamine for horses in which increases in IOP should be minimized.",
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