Effects of iron supplementation on growth, gut microbiota, metabolomics and cognitive development of rat pups

Erica E. Alexeev, Xuan He, Carolyn M. Slupsky, Bo Lonnerdal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Iron deficiency is common during infancy and therefore iron supplementation is recommended. Recent reports suggest that iron supplementation in already iron replete infants may adversely affect growth, cognitive development, and morbidity. Methods Normal and growth restricted rat pups were given iron daily (30 or 150 μg/d) from birth to postnatal day (PD) 20, and followed to PD56. At PD20, hematology, tissue iron, and the hepatic metabolome were measured. The plasma metabolome and colonic microbial ecology were assessed at PD20 and PD56. T-maze (PD35) and passive avoidance (PD40) tests were used to evaluate cognitive development. Results Iron supplementation increased iron status in a dose-dependent manner in both groups, but no significant effect of iron on growth was observed. Passive avoidance was significantly lower only in normal rats given high iron compared with controls. In plasma and liver of normal and growth-restricted rats, excess iron increased 3-hydroxybutyrate and decreased several amino acids, urea and myo-inositol. While a profound difference in gut microbiota of normal and growth-restricted rats was observed, with iron supplementation differences in the abundance of strict anaerobes were observed. Conclusion Excess iron adversely affects cognitive development, which may be a consequence of altered metabolism and/or shifts in gut microbiota.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0179713
JournalPLoS One
Volume12
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

cognitive development
Metabolomics
metabolomics
intestinal microorganisms
pups
Rats
Iron
iron
rats
Growth
metabolome
Metabolome
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
3-hydroxybutyric acid
Plasmas
liver
anaerobes
3-Hydroxybutyric Acid
Liver
microbial ecology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Effects of iron supplementation on growth, gut microbiota, metabolomics and cognitive development of rat pups. / Alexeev, Erica E.; He, Xuan; Slupsky, Carolyn M.; Lonnerdal, Bo.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 12, No. 6, e0179713, 01.06.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alexeev, Erica E. ; He, Xuan ; Slupsky, Carolyn M. ; Lonnerdal, Bo. / Effects of iron supplementation on growth, gut microbiota, metabolomics and cognitive development of rat pups. In: PLoS One. 2017 ; Vol. 12, No. 6.
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