Effects of integrated child development and nutrition interventions on child development and nutritional status

Sally M. Grantham-Mcgregor, Lia C.H. Fernald, Rose M.C. Kagawa, Susan Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We conducted a systematic review of studies that examined the effect of interventions combining a child development component with a nutrition one; in some cases the nutrition interventions also included health-promotion components. Only papers with both child development and nutrition outcomes and rated as moderate-to-good quality were included. Eleven efficacy and two nonrandomized trials, and eight program evaluations were identified. Only six trials examined interventions separately and combined. The trials showed nutritional interventions usually benefited nutritional status and sometimes benefited child development. Stimulation consistently benefited child development. There was no significant loss of any effect when interventions were combined, but there was little evidence of synergistic interaction between nutrition and stimulation on child development. Only three trials followed up the children after intervention. All at-scale program evaluations were combined interventions. Five benefited child development, but one did not, and two showed deficits. There was generally little benefit of at-scale programs to nutritional status. We found no rigorous evaluations of adding stimulation to health and nutrition services at scale and there is an urgent need for them. There is also a need to establish quality-control mechanisms for existing scaled-up programs and to determine their long-term effects. There is also a need to determine if there are any sustained benefits for the children after programs finish.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)11-32
Number of pages22
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1308
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Nutrition
Child Development
Nutritional Status
Program Evaluation
Health
Quality control
Health Promotion
Quality Control
Health Services
Stimulation

Keywords

  • Child development
  • Integrated interventions
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

Effects of integrated child development and nutrition interventions on child development and nutritional status. / Grantham-Mcgregor, Sally M.; Fernald, Lia C.H.; Kagawa, Rose M.C.; Walker, Susan.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1308, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 11-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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