Effects of environmental tobacco smoke on the developing immune system of infant monkeys

Lei Wang, Jesse P. Joad, Kristina Abel, Abigail Spinner, Suzette Smiley-Jewell, Hao Liu, Kent E Pinkerton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is associated with an increased incidence of allergic and infectious diseases among children that is thought to be partly due to the immaturity of the immune system. Objective: We sought to investigate the effects of ETS exposure on immune development during the first year of life in the nonhuman primate. Methods: Fifteen neonatal rhesus monkeys studied to 13 months of postnatal age were randomized into 3 groups: (1) exposure to filtered air, (2) continuous ETS exposure beginning at gestation day 50 (perinatal ETS); and (3) exposure to ETS beginning at 6 months of age (6-month ETS). Complete blood counts, lymphocyte subsets, and mRNA levels of 12 cytokines in PBMCs were measured. Results: Fetal/infant exposure to ETS altered the normal maturation of mRNA levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10, as well as the ratio of CD4 to CD8 lymphocytes, compared with filtered-air control levels. Blood lymphocyte subset distribution also significantly differed based on the onset of exposure to ETS. Subacute exposure to ETS for 2 weeks in 6-month-old infants was found to increase levels of peripheral blood neutrophils and IL-6 mRNA. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to ETS can induce an acute systemic inflammatory response in the neonatal nonhuman primate, and long-term exposure to ETS beginning in utero or at 6 months of postnatal age can significantly alter immune effectors. Clinical implications: Normal immune system development is compromised by in utero and postnatal exposure to ETS and might contribute to ETS-related childhood diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-451
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume120
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2007

Fingerprint

Smoke
Tobacco
Haplorhini
Immune System
Environmental Exposure
Lymphocyte Subsets
Messenger RNA
Primates
Air
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Blood Cell Count
Macaca mulatta
Interleukin-10
Interleukin-2
Communicable Diseases
Interleukin-6
Neutrophils
Lymphocytes
Cytokines
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • cytokine
  • Environmental tobacco smoke
  • gene expression
  • immune system maturation
  • leukocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Effects of environmental tobacco smoke on the developing immune system of infant monkeys. / Wang, Lei; Joad, Jesse P.; Abel, Kristina; Spinner, Abigail; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette; Liu, Hao; Pinkerton, Kent E.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 120, No. 2, 08.2007, p. 445-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Lei ; Joad, Jesse P. ; Abel, Kristina ; Spinner, Abigail ; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette ; Liu, Hao ; Pinkerton, Kent E. / Effects of environmental tobacco smoke on the developing immune system of infant monkeys. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2007 ; Vol. 120, No. 2. pp. 445-451.
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AU - Liu, Hao

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