Effects of duration of isoflurane anesthesia and mode of ventilation on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures in horses

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Abstract

Objective - To test the hypothesis that isoflurane-anesthetized horses during controlled ventilation and spontaneous ventilation exhibit temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics, as measured by intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure, that reflect temporal changes in systemic arterial pressure. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized in left lateral recumbency with 1.57% isoflurane in O2 for 5 hours in 2 experiments by use of either controlled ventilation (with normocapnia) or spontaneous ventilation (with hypercapnia) in a randomized crossover design. Intracranial pressure was measured with a subarachnoid strain-gauge transducer. Carotid artery pressure, central venous pressure, airway pressures, blood gases, and minute ventilation also were measured. Results - Intracranial pressure during controlled ventilation significantly increased during constant dose isoflurane anesthesia and thus contributed to decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure. Intracranial pressure was initially higher during spontaneous ventilation than during controlled ventilation, but this difference disappeared over time; no significant differences in cerebral perfusion pressures were observed between horses that had spontaneous or controlled ventilation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Cerebral hemodynamics and their association with ventilation mode are altered over time in isoflurane-anesthetized horses and could contribute to decreased cerebral perfusion during prolonged anesthesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1444-1448
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume64
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2003

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Isoflurane
isoflurane
Horses
Ventilation
anesthesia
Anesthesia
horses
duration
Intracranial Pressure
hemodynamics
Hemodynamics
Central Venous Pressure
Hypercapnia
hypercapnia
carotid arteries
transducers (equipment)
Transducers
blood gases
Carotid Arteries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Effects of duration of isoflurane anesthesia and mode of ventilation on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures in horses",
abstract = "Objective - To test the hypothesis that isoflurane-anesthetized horses during controlled ventilation and spontaneous ventilation exhibit temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics, as measured by intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure, that reflect temporal changes in systemic arterial pressure. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized in left lateral recumbency with 1.57{\%} isoflurane in O2 for 5 hours in 2 experiments by use of either controlled ventilation (with normocapnia) or spontaneous ventilation (with hypercapnia) in a randomized crossover design. Intracranial pressure was measured with a subarachnoid strain-gauge transducer. Carotid artery pressure, central venous pressure, airway pressures, blood gases, and minute ventilation also were measured. Results - Intracranial pressure during controlled ventilation significantly increased during constant dose isoflurane anesthesia and thus contributed to decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure. Intracranial pressure was initially higher during spontaneous ventilation than during controlled ventilation, but this difference disappeared over time; no significant differences in cerebral perfusion pressures were observed between horses that had spontaneous or controlled ventilation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Cerebral hemodynamics and their association with ventilation mode are altered over time in isoflurane-anesthetized horses and could contribute to decreased cerebral perfusion during prolonged anesthesia.",
author = "Brosnan, {Robert J} and Eugene Steffey and Lecouteur, {Richard A} and Farver, {Thomas B} and Ayako Imai",
year = "2003",
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doi = "10.2460/ajvr.2003.64.1444",
language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Effects of duration of isoflurane anesthesia and mode of ventilation on intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures in horses

AU - Brosnan, Robert J

AU - Steffey, Eugene

AU - Lecouteur, Richard A

AU - Farver, Thomas B

AU - Imai, Ayako

PY - 2003/11

Y1 - 2003/11

N2 - Objective - To test the hypothesis that isoflurane-anesthetized horses during controlled ventilation and spontaneous ventilation exhibit temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics, as measured by intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure, that reflect temporal changes in systemic arterial pressure. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized in left lateral recumbency with 1.57% isoflurane in O2 for 5 hours in 2 experiments by use of either controlled ventilation (with normocapnia) or spontaneous ventilation (with hypercapnia) in a randomized crossover design. Intracranial pressure was measured with a subarachnoid strain-gauge transducer. Carotid artery pressure, central venous pressure, airway pressures, blood gases, and minute ventilation also were measured. Results - Intracranial pressure during controlled ventilation significantly increased during constant dose isoflurane anesthesia and thus contributed to decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure. Intracranial pressure was initially higher during spontaneous ventilation than during controlled ventilation, but this difference disappeared over time; no significant differences in cerebral perfusion pressures were observed between horses that had spontaneous or controlled ventilation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Cerebral hemodynamics and their association with ventilation mode are altered over time in isoflurane-anesthetized horses and could contribute to decreased cerebral perfusion during prolonged anesthesia.

AB - Objective - To test the hypothesis that isoflurane-anesthetized horses during controlled ventilation and spontaneous ventilation exhibit temporal changes in cerebral hemodynamics, as measured by intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure, that reflect temporal changes in systemic arterial pressure. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized in left lateral recumbency with 1.57% isoflurane in O2 for 5 hours in 2 experiments by use of either controlled ventilation (with normocapnia) or spontaneous ventilation (with hypercapnia) in a randomized crossover design. Intracranial pressure was measured with a subarachnoid strain-gauge transducer. Carotid artery pressure, central venous pressure, airway pressures, blood gases, and minute ventilation also were measured. Results - Intracranial pressure during controlled ventilation significantly increased during constant dose isoflurane anesthesia and thus contributed to decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure. Intracranial pressure was initially higher during spontaneous ventilation than during controlled ventilation, but this difference disappeared over time; no significant differences in cerebral perfusion pressures were observed between horses that had spontaneous or controlled ventilation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Cerebral hemodynamics and their association with ventilation mode are altered over time in isoflurane-anesthetized horses and could contribute to decreased cerebral perfusion during prolonged anesthesia.

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