Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures

Hnin H. Aung, Vihas T. Vasu, Giuseppe Valacchi, Ana M. Corbacho, Rama S. Kota, Yunsook Lim, Ute C. Obermueller-Jevic, Lester Packer, Carroll E Cross, Kishorchandra Gohil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male C57BL/6 mice were fed diets supplemented with either β-carotene (BC) or lycopene (LY) that were formulated for human consumption. Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans. Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (∼8,500 mRNAs). Both CARs activated the cytochrome P450 1A1 gene but only BC induced the retinol dehydrogenase gene. The contrasting effects of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further uncovered in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 3 days; only LY activated ∼50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These genes encoded inflammatoryimmune proteins. Our data suggest that mice offer a viable in vivo model for studying bioactivities of dietary CARs and their modulatory effects on lung genomic expression in both health and after exposure to CS toxicants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-39
Number of pages17
JournalGenes and Nutrition
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Carotenoids
Smoke
Tobacco Products
Lung
Transcriptome
Genes
Dietary Supplements
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System
Diet
Messenger RNA
Health
Proteins
lycopene

Keywords

  • β-Carotene
  • C57BL/6 mice
  • Cigarette smoke
  • Granulocytes
  • Lung inflammation
  • Lycopene
  • Oligonucleotide arrays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Genetics

Cite this

Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures. / Aung, Hnin H.; Vasu, Vihas T.; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Corbacho, Ana M.; Kota, Rama S.; Lim, Yunsook; Obermueller-Jevic, Ute C.; Packer, Lester; Cross, Carroll E; Gohil, Kishorchandra.

In: Genes and Nutrition, Vol. 4, No. 1, 03.2009, p. 23-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aung, HH, Vasu, VT, Valacchi, G, Corbacho, AM, Kota, RS, Lim, Y, Obermueller-Jevic, UC, Packer, L, Cross, CE & Gohil, K 2009, 'Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures', Genes and Nutrition, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 23-39. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12263-008-0108-z
Aung, Hnin H. ; Vasu, Vihas T. ; Valacchi, Giuseppe ; Corbacho, Ana M. ; Kota, Rama S. ; Lim, Yunsook ; Obermueller-Jevic, Ute C. ; Packer, Lester ; Cross, Carroll E ; Gohil, Kishorchandra. / Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures. In: Genes and Nutrition. 2009 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 23-39.
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