Effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and clinicopathologic variables in horses

Eugene Steffey, Michael J. Woliner, Birgit Puschner, Frank D. Galey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To quantitate the effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and identify changes in selected clinicopathologic variables and serum fluoride values associated with desflurane anesthesia in horses. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized on 2 occasions: first, to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of desflurane in O2 and second, to characterize cardiopulmonary and clinicopathologic responses to 1X, 1.5X, and 1.75X desflurane MAC during both controlled and spontaneous ventilation. Results - Mean ± SEM MAC of desflurane in horses was 8.06 ± 0.41%; inhalation of desflurane did not appear to cause airway irritation. During spontaneous ventilation, mean PaCO2 was 69 mm Hg. Arterial blood pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output decreased as the dose of desflurane increased. Conditions of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and eucapnia resulted in further cardiovascular depression. Horses recovered quickly from anesthesia with little transient or no clinicopathologic evidence of adverse effects. Serum fluoride concentration before and after administration of desflurane was below the limit of detection of 0.05 ppm (2.63μM/L). Conclusions and clinical relevance - Results indicate that desflurane, like other inhalation anesthetics, causes profound hypoventilation in horses. The magnitude of cardiovascular depression is related to dose and mode of ventilation; cardiovascular depression is less severe at doses of 1X to 1.5X MAC, compared with known effects of other inhalation anesthetics under similar conditions. Desflurane is not metabolized to an important degree and does not appear to prominently influence renal function or hepatic cellular integrity or function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-677
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume66
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

Fingerprint

lung function
Horses
Ventilation
horses
breathing
fluorides
anesthetics
anesthesia
Inhalation Anesthetics
dosage
Fluorides
renal function
cardiac output
stroke
Anesthesia
blood pressure
desflurane
Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation
detection limit
Hypoventilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and clinicopathologic variables in horses. / Steffey, Eugene; Woliner, Michael J.; Puschner, Birgit; Galey, Frank D.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 66, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 669-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6dfa994c4cff4836a6dcf77a5d5022c8,
title = "Effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and clinicopathologic variables in horses",
abstract = "Objective - To quantitate the effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and identify changes in selected clinicopathologic variables and serum fluoride values associated with desflurane anesthesia in horses. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized on 2 occasions: first, to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of desflurane in O2 and second, to characterize cardiopulmonary and clinicopathologic responses to 1X, 1.5X, and 1.75X desflurane MAC during both controlled and spontaneous ventilation. Results - Mean ± SEM MAC of desflurane in horses was 8.06 ± 0.41{\%}; inhalation of desflurane did not appear to cause airway irritation. During spontaneous ventilation, mean PaCO2 was 69 mm Hg. Arterial blood pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output decreased as the dose of desflurane increased. Conditions of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and eucapnia resulted in further cardiovascular depression. Horses recovered quickly from anesthesia with little transient or no clinicopathologic evidence of adverse effects. Serum fluoride concentration before and after administration of desflurane was below the limit of detection of 0.05 ppm (2.63μM/L). Conclusions and clinical relevance - Results indicate that desflurane, like other inhalation anesthetics, causes profound hypoventilation in horses. The magnitude of cardiovascular depression is related to dose and mode of ventilation; cardiovascular depression is less severe at doses of 1X to 1.5X MAC, compared with known effects of other inhalation anesthetics under similar conditions. Desflurane is not metabolized to an important degree and does not appear to prominently influence renal function or hepatic cellular integrity or function.",
author = "Eugene Steffey and Woliner, {Michael J.} and Birgit Puschner and Galey, {Frank D.}",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
doi = "10.2460/ajvr.2005.66.669",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "66",
pages = "669--677",
journal = "American Journal of Veterinary Research",
issn = "0002-9645",
publisher = "American Veterinary Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and clinicopathologic variables in horses

AU - Steffey, Eugene

AU - Woliner, Michael J.

AU - Puschner, Birgit

AU - Galey, Frank D.

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - Objective - To quantitate the effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and identify changes in selected clinicopathologic variables and serum fluoride values associated with desflurane anesthesia in horses. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized on 2 occasions: first, to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of desflurane in O2 and second, to characterize cardiopulmonary and clinicopathologic responses to 1X, 1.5X, and 1.75X desflurane MAC during both controlled and spontaneous ventilation. Results - Mean ± SEM MAC of desflurane in horses was 8.06 ± 0.41%; inhalation of desflurane did not appear to cause airway irritation. During spontaneous ventilation, mean PaCO2 was 69 mm Hg. Arterial blood pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output decreased as the dose of desflurane increased. Conditions of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and eucapnia resulted in further cardiovascular depression. Horses recovered quickly from anesthesia with little transient or no clinicopathologic evidence of adverse effects. Serum fluoride concentration before and after administration of desflurane was below the limit of detection of 0.05 ppm (2.63μM/L). Conclusions and clinical relevance - Results indicate that desflurane, like other inhalation anesthetics, causes profound hypoventilation in horses. The magnitude of cardiovascular depression is related to dose and mode of ventilation; cardiovascular depression is less severe at doses of 1X to 1.5X MAC, compared with known effects of other inhalation anesthetics under similar conditions. Desflurane is not metabolized to an important degree and does not appear to prominently influence renal function or hepatic cellular integrity or function.

AB - Objective - To quantitate the effects of desflurane and mode of ventilation on cardiovascular and respiratory functions and identify changes in selected clinicopathologic variables and serum fluoride values associated with desflurane anesthesia in horses. Animals - 6 healthy adult horses. Procedure - Horses were anesthetized on 2 occasions: first, to determine the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of desflurane in O2 and second, to characterize cardiopulmonary and clinicopathologic responses to 1X, 1.5X, and 1.75X desflurane MAC during both controlled and spontaneous ventilation. Results - Mean ± SEM MAC of desflurane in horses was 8.06 ± 0.41%; inhalation of desflurane did not appear to cause airway irritation. During spontaneous ventilation, mean PaCO2 was 69 mm Hg. Arterial blood pressure, stroke volume, and cardiac output decreased as the dose of desflurane increased. Conditions of intermittent positive pressure ventilation and eucapnia resulted in further cardiovascular depression. Horses recovered quickly from anesthesia with little transient or no clinicopathologic evidence of adverse effects. Serum fluoride concentration before and after administration of desflurane was below the limit of detection of 0.05 ppm (2.63μM/L). Conclusions and clinical relevance - Results indicate that desflurane, like other inhalation anesthetics, causes profound hypoventilation in horses. The magnitude of cardiovascular depression is related to dose and mode of ventilation; cardiovascular depression is less severe at doses of 1X to 1.5X MAC, compared with known effects of other inhalation anesthetics under similar conditions. Desflurane is not metabolized to an important degree and does not appear to prominently influence renal function or hepatic cellular integrity or function.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=17544378363&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=17544378363&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2460/ajvr.2005.66.669

DO - 10.2460/ajvr.2005.66.669

M3 - Article

C2 - 15900949

AN - SCOPUS:17544378363

VL - 66

SP - 669

EP - 677

JO - American Journal of Veterinary Research

JF - American Journal of Veterinary Research

SN - 0002-9645

IS - 4

ER -